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ck
i dont care about anything
i just love my h2
stop bitching start riding:)
 
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ck
i dont care about anything
i just love my h2
stop bitching start riding:)
6,300 ks on mine which i managed to do through winter and having the bike off the road for 3 weeks while in the shop.I am riding mine and we are getting along better every time we go out.Last week went for a ride through some pretty tight twisty stuff and without much effort a new suzuki 1000 naked couldnt do the pace.In the early stages it would have had a chance as we all know it takes a while to ride this bike properly.by the time i have 10,000 ks up it will be pretty well mastered ,well as mastered as this beast can be without ending up in a ditch or dead.:):)
 

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The H2R is already priceless to me...I already scared the day light out of everyone that was UN-lucky enough to hear it scream. I suppose I bought it just for the reason to scare my friends.
 

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5700 miles in 4 months, recently in 40F temps. Great night ride Saturday to Bridgeport CT after riding all day. The Merritt parkway (route 15) was always twisty for a parkway but the concrete was rough, it's been repaved in smooth, fresh asphalt during the last 2 years & made for an incredible ride for us at 2am. Dark but fun as heck..... Rides may be few and far between but I plan to keep riding through the winter as weather permits.
 

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Riding all day today and then just got home (1am) after last trip of the night from NYC to Riverhead & back to Great Neck 180 miles in 34F, can't help myself. With the right base thermal layers, leathers, freeze out balaclava, gore text gloves & silk liners - no problem at all, comfortable actually. No bitching here, riding! It's supposed to be a balmy 60 degrees this week!
 

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On Canadian Kawasaki Motors Inc., the 2016 H2 and H2R are available for pre-order. The pictures are the same colour as the 2015 except the frame colour is no longer green.
I'm confused, see bold type below. They really didn't put an ECO mode button on the H2, right?

"Lifestyle

Designed to offer riding excitement at a level never before experienced, the unprecedented Ninja H2 combines the joy derived from sport riding and the kind of intense acceleration that made the 1971 H2 (750SS Mach IV) a worldwide sensation. Tapping into the technological know-how possessed by the KHI Group, it has elevated motorcycle technology to a new level.

Engine

Displacement 998cc
Type 4-stroke, In-Line Four
Bore and stroke 76.0 x 55.0 mm
Cooling Liquid
Compression ratio 8.5:1
Valve system DOHC, 16 valves (4 valves per cylinder)
Fuel system 50mm x4 with dual injection
Ignition Digital
Lubrication Forced lubrication (wet sump with oil cooler)
Intake System Kawasaki Supercharger
Brakes

Front: type Dual semi-floating 330 mm petal discs
Front: calipers Dual radial-mount, opposed 4-piston
Rear: type Single 250 mm disc
Rear: calipers Opposed 2-piston
Dimensions

Overall length 2,085 mm
Overall width 770 mm
Overall height 1,125 mm
Wheelbase 1,455 mm
Ground clearance 130 mm
Seat height 825 mm
Curb mass** 237 kg
Fuel capacity 17 litres (3.7 gal.)
Drivetrain

Transmission 6-speed, dog-ring
Final drive Chain
Primary reduction ratio 1.551 (76/49)
Gear ratio: 1st 3.188 (51/16)
Gear ratio: 2nd 2.526 (48/19)
Gear ratio: 3rd 2.045 (45/22)
Gear ratio: 4th 1.727 (38/22)
Gear ratio: 5th 1.524 (32/21)
Gear ratio: 6th 1.348 (31/23)
Final reduction ratio 2.444 (44/18)
Clutch Wet multi-disc, manual
Frame

Type Trellis, high-tensile steel, with Swingarm Mounting Plate
Wheel travel: front 120 mm (4.7 in.)
Tire: front 120/70ZR17M/C (58W)
Wheel travel: rear 135 mm
Tire: rear 200/55ZR17M/C (78W)
Caster (rake) 24.5º
Trail 103 mm
Steering angle (left/right) 27º/27º
Performance

Maximum Torque‡ 133.5 N.m {13.6 kgf.m} @ 10,500 rpm
Suspension

Suspension, front 43 mm inverted fork with rebound and compression damping, spring preload adjustability and top-out springs
Suspension, rear New Uni-Trak with gas-charged shock, piggyback resevoir, dual-range (high/low-speed) compression damping, rebound damping and preload adjustability, and top-out spring
Factory Limited Warranty Owner's Warranty Guide

This model comes with 12 months factory limited warranty.

Kawasaki keeps the good times rolling with unlimited kilometers/hours of usage. We have you covered with our nationwide, Kawasaki dealer network. Visit any authorized Kawasaki dealer (for this product line) throughout Canada and continental USA for factory warranty coverage.

Click “Owner’s Warranty Guide” for full details regarding Kawasaki’s factory limited warranty coverage.

Kawasaki Protection Plus Learn More

Kawasaki’s own Kawasaki Protection Plus (KPP) goes the distance with available two, three, and four years of unlimited kilometers/hours additional coverage on top of the original Kawasaki limited warranty. That’s up to seven years total coverage depending on the base warranty term!

Feel secure knowing that Kawasaki Protection Plus repairs are performed only at authorized Kawasaki dealers (for this product line) throughout Canada and continental USA using only Kawasaki genuine parts.

Enjoy additional peace of mind with roadside assistance on street legal motorcycles. Buy early - roadside assistance coverage begins when you buy KPP.

No surprises. There’s no deductible fees with KPP for covered repairs.

Click “Learn More” for more details regarding Kawasaki Protection Plus.

MSRP*

$28,600
Special offers

Kawapedia
Launch Control Mode
In motocross racing, getting a good start is critical. A few tenths of a second can make the difference between getting the holeshot or not. In slippery conditions, getting the maximum drive from a motocrosser requires precise control of the both the clutch and throttle.

Launch Control Mode helps riders get a good start by complementing high-level technique with engine management. Featured on a mass-production motocrosser for the first time on Kawasaki's KX450F, the system activates a separate engine map designed to get a more efficient start off the line. The system is designed to the same specifications as that used by our factory racers competing in the AMA Supercross and Motocross championships.

Launch Control Mode is activated simply by pressing the button on the handlebar. The Launch Control map slightly retards ignition timing to help tame the engine's strong torque and reduce wheel spin off the start. Launch Control Mode is only active in the first two gears off the start, disengaging and returning to the standard engine map automatically once the rider shifts into 3rd gear. The system gives riders a great advantage when lining up at the gate and puts them in a better position to win.

Dual Throttle Valves
Late-model sport bikes often use large-bore throttle bodies to generate high levels of power. However, with large diameter throttles, when a rider suddenly opens the throttle, the unrestricted torque response is anything but gentle and often more than the rider can handle. Dual throttle valve technology was designed to tame engine response while contributing to performance.

On fuel-injected models, throttle bodies generally have only one throttle valve per cylinder. On models with dual throttle valves, there are two throttle valves per cylinder: in addition to the main valves, which are physically linked to the throttle grip and controlled by the rider, a second set of valves, opened and closed by the ECU, precisely regulates intake airflow to ensure a natural, linear response. With the air passing through the throttle bodies becoming smoother, combustion efficiency in improved and power is increased.

Like other Kawasaki engine management technology, Dual Throttle Valves were designed with the philosophy of "following the rider's intention, while providing natural-feeling support." They are featured on many Kawasaki models.

Dual Injectors
Kawasaki's KX250F was the first mass-production motocrosser to feature Dual Injectors. One injector is located downstream of the throttle valve, where injectors are located on standard FI systems, and a second is located upstream of the throttle valve, close to the airbox. The two injectors split their roles: operating at different rpm ranges, they ensure both smooth, instant response at low-rpm and high peak power at high-rpm.

For cases that call for low-rpm operation like instantaneous acceleration off the start and precise control when cornering, primary operation falls to the downstream injector. Because it is positioned close to the combustion chamber, sprayed fuel can be supplied to the engine quickly, resulting in sharp response. Conversely, when high power is the priority, primary operation switches to the upstream injector, which focuses on high-rpm applications. Its location farther away from the combustion chamber means that the fuel has a longer travel time. This allows more time for the fuel particles and air to mix, as well as allowing the mixture to cool and condense. This means that when more power is needed, the cylinder can be filled with a greater quantity of high-quality mixture.

Assist & Slipper Clutch
Based on feedback from racing activities, the Assist & Slipper Clutch uses two types of cams (an assist cam and a slipper cam) to either drive the clutch hub and operating plate together or apart.

Under normal operation, the assist cam functions as a self-servo mechanism, pulling the clutch hub and operating plate together to compress the clutch plates. This allows the total clutch spring load to be reduced, resulting in a lighter clutch lever feel when operating the clutch.

When excessive engine braking occurs – as a result of quick downshifts (or an accidental downshift) – the slipper cam comes into play, forcing the clutch hub and operating plate apart. This relieves pressure on the clutch plates to reduce back-torque and help prevent the rear tyre from hopping and skidding.

KTRC (3-mode)
3-mode KTRC combines the traction control technology of both 1-mode KTRC, which provides enhanced stability in slippery situations by preventing wheel slip, and S-KTRC, which helps maintain optimum traction in sport riding situations by predicting the rear wheel slip ratio during acceleration, into a single system.

The convenient handle switch allows the type of traction control to be changed instantly by selecting one of the three modes, even while riding. Modes 1 and 2 maintain optimum traction during cornering, like S-KTRC. Designed with sport riding in mind, they enable sharp acceleration out of corners by maximising forward drive from the rear wheel. Modes 1 and 2 differ in the amount that they intervene. Mode 1, set for dry, good-grip road conditions, maintains the ideal slip ratio to ensure optimum traction.

Mode 3 operates like 1-mode KTRC, reducing power to allow grip to be regained when rear wheel spin is detected. It is ideal when riding in slippery conditions or in the wet. Enabling riders to easily change traction control character, 3-mode KTRC is Kawasaki's most advanced engine management system.

Power Modes
Power modes offer riders an easily selectable choice between Full and Low Power. While Full Power is unrestricted, in Low Power mode maximum power is limited to approximately 75-80% of Full. Response is also milder in Low Power mode. Riders may opt to use Low Power mode for rainy conditions or city riding, and Full Power when sport riding.

Available on the Ninja ZX-14R / ZZR1400, Versys 1000 and other key models, when combined with the 3-mode KTRC (+ OFF) traction control system, Power Mode selection offers a total of eight combinations (KTRC: Mode 1/2/3+OFF x Power Mode: Full/Low) to suit a wide range of riding situations. For example, an experienced rider enjoying sport riding on dry pavement might choose Full Power and Mode 1. On a wet or slippery surface, choosing Low Power and Mode 3 would yield the lowest chance of incurring wheel spin, and with the milder throttle response would offer a high level of riding safety.


Fuel Economy Assistance Mode
By pushing the handle switch, riders are able to activate the Fuel Economy Assistance Mode, switching the ECU to a leaner fuel map in which ignition timing and fuel injection prioritise fuel economy. Rather than engine response or power, this mode favours reduced fuel consumption, aiming to increase fuel economy when riding at a constant speed. When riding in areas where gasoline stands are scarce, or when cruising across the continent, being able to make the same amount of fuel last longer is a considerable benefit.

Maximising the effectiveness of the Fuel Economy Assistance Mode requires a gentle use of the throttle. In the case of the 1400GTR / Concours 14, this means keeping engine rpm under 6,000 rpm, throttle under 30%, and speed under 160 km/h. Nevertheless, especially when used in conjunction with the Economical Riding Indicator, this mode can contribute to significant savings in fuel costs over long distances.



KIBS: Kawasaki Intelligent anti-lock Brake System
Kawasaki developed KIBS to take into account the particular handling characteristics of supersport motorcycles, ensuring highly efficient braking with minimal intrusion during hard sport riding. It is the first mass-production brake system to link the ABS ECU (Electronic Control Unit) and engine ECU.

In addition front and rear wheel speed, KIBS monitors front brake caliper hydraulic pressure, throttle position, engine speed, clutch actuation and gear position. This diverse information is analysed to determine the ideal front brake hydraulic pressure. Through precise control, the large drops in hydraulic pressure seen on standard ABS systems can be avoided. Additionally, the tendency on supersport models for the rear wheel to lift under heavy braking can be suppressed and rear brake controllability can be maintained when downshifting.


Supercharged Engine
Drawing on the know-how and technology possessed by the KHI Group, Kawasaki’s supercharged engine delivers high engine output while maintaining a compact design. The key to achieving this incredible performance lies in the engine’s supercharger – a motorcycle-specific unit designed completely in-house with technology from Kawasaki’s Gas Turbine & Machinery Company, Aerospace Company and Corporate Technology Division.

One of the greatest benefits of designing the supercharger in-house and tailoring its design to match the engine’s characteristics was that engineers were able to achieve high-efficiency operation over a wide range of conditions – something that would not have been possible by simply dropping in or trying to adapt an aftermarket automotive supercharger.

The importance of high efficiency in a supercharger is that, as the air is compressed, power-robbing heat gain is minimal. And while many superchargers are able to offer high-efficiency operation in a very limited range of conditions, Kawasaki’s supercharger offers high efficiency over a wide range of pressure ratios and flow rates – meaning over a wide range of engine speeds and vehicle speeds. This wide range of efficient operation (similar to having a wide power band) easily translates to strong acceleration. The supercharger’s high efficiency and minimal heat gain also meant that an intercooler was unnecessary, greatly saving weight and space, and enabling the engine’s compact design.


Kawasaki Engine Brake Control
The Kawasaki Engine Brake Control system allows riders to select the amount of engine braking they prefer. When the system is activated, the engine braking effect is reduced, providing less interference when riding on the circuit.


Electronic Throttle Valves
Kawasaki’s fully electronic throttle actuation system enables the ECU to control the volume of both the fuel (via fuel injectors) and the air (via throttle valves) delivered to the engine. Ideal fuel injection and throttle valve position results in smooth, natural engine response and the ideal engine output. The system also makes a significant contribution to reduced emissions.

Electronic throttle valves also enable more precise control of electronic engine management systems like S-KTRC and KTRC, and allow the implementation of electronic systems like KLCM, Kawasaki Engine Brake Control, and Cruise Control.


Silver-Mirror Paint
Kawasaki’s high-quality original paint has a highly reflective, glasslike metal appearance. Its debut on the 2015 Ninja H2 and Ninja H2R marked its first use on a mass-production vehicle in either the automotive or motorcycle industries.

In the shade the paint has the appearance of its base coat colour, but once in the sunlight its highly reflective surface takes on the appearance of the surrounding scenery. The stark difference in the way the paint appears in the light and the shade emphasises the sculpted shape of the bodywork on which it is applied.

The highly reflective surface is created by inducing a silver mirror reaction (a chemical reaction between a solution of silver ions and a reducing agent) that forms a layer of pure silver (Ag). This Ag layer is what creates the paint’s glasslike metal appearance. Compared to candy paints, which use aluminium flakes to generate a sparkling effect, the Ag layer appears as a uniform metallic surface.
In the shade the Ag layer is translucent, allowing the base coat colour to show through. This gives the paint a deep, three-dimensional quality.

While the multiple layers of paint on typical mass-production models are done by robot painters, for this silver-mirror paint each layer – from primer to clear coat – is carefully finished by the hands of Kawasaki craftsmen to ensure a flawless, lustrous surface.

KQS: Kawasaki Quick Shifter
Designed to help riders maximise their acceleration on the circuit by enabling clutchless upshifts with the throttle fully open, KQS detects that the shift lever has been actuated and sends a signal to the ECU to cut ignition so that the next gear can be engaged without having to use the clutch. For some models, when a race kit ECU is used, clutchless downshifts are also possible.

Best kept secret"
 

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They are saying the 'paint' is a "more durable" offering over the 2015.Not sure what that means actually.Possibly a coating applied at the factory?That'd be good.Plus it's a 'spark black metallic'...with I think the Mirror Coat also...a bit different than our 2015's.'durable paint'...good.New color..?Not original.Not as good IMO.But good for US with the 2015's.

I'm curious about the engine 'upgrade'...the fueling and such.I think after the firestorm of 'complaints' about the performance a 25K 'new' powerhouse 'should' have...they decided to unleash this thing more in line with what most truly wanted in the fueling department.Slight disappointment here.Plus the revamped SC deal(that is with this 2016 model,right?).I think Kawasaki 'should' allow the first owners to update their SC's at no charge..or at least a minimum charge.I certainly won't die if they don't...but it kinda seems like a 'right thing to do'???I mean...surely they KNEW about the 'upgrade' well before they rolled out the first ones?I can't believe they didn't have the expertise about this before 2015.


Hmmm...that's an interesting deal there.We who own this 2015...that should also be a free upgrade(or a minimum charge).IMO.Course,it appears the MSRP jumped another 3K for the 2016.At least in Canada?I'd be curious now to see the actual fuel mileages this new 2016 will pull down.Mine is getting VERY nice mileages if I ride it a certain way.If the tank was a larger volume(say,5.5 or so)...it'd be at least equal to my 1441 Ninja.That one pulls down really good mileages.I mean...my H2 right now is equal and somewhat better than that 1441.Depending.It does drink more than the 1441 when on the gas.
 

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I think Kawasaki 'should' allow the first owners to update their SC's at no charge..or at least a minimum charge.I certainly won't die if they don't...but it kinda seems like a 'right thing to do'???I mean...surely they KNEW about the 'upgrade' well before they rolled out the first ones?I can't believe they didn't have the expertise about this before 2015.

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Starting off by saying, I am not being an ******* lol, but you can't expect Kawasaki to give any 2015 owners anything really. I will use the GTR as an example. It started off at 480hp and is now making 545hp with more revisions. You couldn't expect Nissan to give every 2009 owner the revisions and or any of the upgrades. If you want the upgrades you have to buy the new product ;)

The 2015 is a first year model, so even after all their testing, improvements can be expected for each model year after.
 
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I will use the GTR as an example. It started off at 480hp and is now making 545hp with more revisions. You couldn't expect Nissan to give every 2009 owner the revisions and or any of the upgrades. If you want the upgrades you have to buy the new product ;)

The 2015 is a first year model, so even after all their testing, improvements can be expected for each model year after.

Good example. However, in a different league, McLaren offered its 2009 owners upgrades to the 2010 ECU change and other parts directly. I remember reading that on a exotic car site somewhere before. I'll see if I can find that link and will post. I think it was for the F1. To me, that proves McLaren cares and want their customers to see it.


UPDATE:
I actually had a bookmark saved of the file. Here is the posted PDF from the autoblog site and not an exotic car site. It was just a car blog site. It wasn't just ecu and other parts, it was a package upgrade... not sure of price point but I'm sure it wasn't over priced, especially for a McLaren F1 owner.
 

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^That's interesting. I guess it would easier given less numbers, but that could also be said about the H2 since there is probably less than 2500 in the whole world. After reading that it, it was for 64 cars. Regardless good move on their part.
 

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Really interesting to read that mc claren have done this. This would set two rivers apart from all other manufacturers and be motorcycle industry first. It would allay fears of buying an early edition in the future and could surely only assist sales.
 

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What is the difference in the super charger? Low speed drive ability?
 

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^I don't think there is a change in the actual charger design. What I saw was an ECO button mode that runs the bike leaner for partial throttle cruising for better fuel economy. There is also better ECU mapping.
 

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Course,it appears the MSRP jumped another 3K for the 2016.At least in Canada?
That quotation was from Canadian Kawasaki and would have been in C$. The 2015 MSRP in Canada was C$27,500, so it is up C$1100 in local currency. The exchange rate is to blame. C$28,600 = approx US$21,450 ... Come get 'em ... ! ! ! Bear in mind we have a 13% tax on top of that ...
 

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Hey Ben1000z,
The extended warranty on my bike was 1,480.00, U.S. for 5 years of coverage.
I'm not sure what they would be like in France. Maybe you could ask your motorcycle shop what it would be, and if it would even be available now.
 
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