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No, with the anti-knock capabilities the engine will adjust quickly if it starts to knock. If you were to turn up the boost, it would benefit from higher octane to the extent that the anti knock did not back off timing. If you make ecu and PCV adjustments, you could pick up power there. Picking the right fuel is a fine art. You should start with the fuel company's recommendation and then adjust from there based on results. I have seen cars at Bonneville use the suggested fuel and not run too well and then make a switch and pick up 10 mph. My old Honda CX race bikes are tough to tune for as they are aluminum, water cooled, pushrod, high rpm, twin motors and seem to defy conventional logic when picking a fuel.


If you study Brock's tuning, I think he used 89 octane for his best results. With a tune, I believe to one of the many VP products for better results.
 

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FOR THE LOVE OF GOD DO NOT PUT 89 IN YOUR H2!!!!!!!!!!

Octane, also refered to as 'anti-knock index' is meant to represent how well the fuel can stand up to pre-detonation (caused by heat and pressure). Cheap gas sometimes goes bang early if you squeeze it too hard in a hot cylinder. The H2's entire purpose is extreme pressue. Thats why that sticker on the tank says 'use whatever the good stuff is in your country' (I'm paraphrasing). Pre-detonation (or knock) causes things to go boom; broken rods, holed pistons and blown headgaskets are all on the table. Its fine in a car/bike with low compression, low horsepower, doesn't see extreme use and has a computer to dial it back if it starts causing problems.

If you put 89 octane in an H2 on unsubstantiated advice...that's just a terrible idea. Did you-know-who explain scientifically why he thinks that's a good idea? Its like you'd have to completely misunderstand the entire principal of forced induction and have absolutely no clue how the H2 works in addition to knowing nothing about gas. Conversely, something like a Hayabusa would probably love low octane if you tuned it right. However, If you're mixing philosophies between the H2 and big motor bikes, you're going to break some stuff.

Not saying an H2 won't run on 89. It probably will just fine while the bike is still cold or the outside air is cold. The added volatility may even be a benefit in certain conditions. However, when you get up into the high RPM range, the heat has soaked in to everything including the air box, the outside ambient air temp is up - that 89 is going to start beating your spark plugs to the punch. You start doing roll-ons in the summer heat with some nice, warm 89 octane in the tank - yikes. The computer can only intervene so much - and to know it's knocking, your engine has to do it a couple times, which is bad, especially if you have an impeller next to your nuts breaking the speed of sound. You knock enough times under heavy load, you're going to be buying parts.

(In my head that reads as friendly, conversational sharing of information directly. Its not meant to sound dick-ish. I don't know how else to say it. I swear, it sounded nice in my head. Mostly).
 

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If you want to spend the money on race fuel for a mostly-stock bike (with the oxygen sensor and catalyst in place), you will want one of the (relatively) low octane unleaded fuels that are meant for stock or near-stock engines. (A "low" octane racing fuel still has a higher octane rating than premium pump unleaded)

road racing fuel, flat track racing fuel

I am absolutely not in a position to distinguish between any of the multitude of choices.
 

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The H2 has a knock sensor so that the engine can cope with a range of fuels but Kawasaki tell you not to use anything less than Research Octane Number (RON) 95.

Also, discussed elsewhere, an Ethanol content E10 OR LESS.
 

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FOR THE LOVE OF GOD DO NOT PUT 89 IN YOUR H2!!!!!!!!!!

Octane, also refered to as 'anti-knock index' is meant to represent how well the fuel can stand up to pre-detonation (caused by heat and pressure). Cheap gas sometimes goes bang early if you squeeze it too hard in a hot cylinder. The H2's entire purpose is extreme pressue. Thats why that sticker on the tank says 'use whatever the good stuff is in your country' (I'm paraphrasing). Pre-detonation (or knock) causes things to go boom; broken rods, holed pistons and blown headgaskets are all on the table. Its fine in a car/bike with low compression, low horsepower, doesn't see extreme use and has a computer to dial it back if it starts causing problems.

If you put 89 octane in an H2 on unsubstantiated advice...that's just a terrible idea. Did you-know-who explain scientifically why he thinks that's a good idea? Its like you'd have to completely misunderstand the entire principal of forced induction and have absolutely no clue how the H2 works in addition to knowing nothing about gas. Conversely, something like a Hayabusa would probably love low octane if you tuned it right. However, If you're mixing philosophies between the H2 and big motor bikes, you're going to break some stuff.

Not saying an H2 won't run on 89. It probably will just fine while the bike is still cold or the outside air is cold. The added volatility may even be a benefit in certain conditions. However, when you get up into the high RPM range, the heat has soaked in to everything including the air box, the outside ambient air temp is up - that 89 is going to start beating your spark plugs to the punch. You start doing roll-ons in the summer heat with some nice, warm 89 octane in the tank - yikes. The computer can only intervene so much - and to know it's knocking, your engine has to do it a couple times, which is bad, especially if you have an impeller next to your nuts breaking the speed of sound. You knock enough times under heavy load, you're going to be buying parts.

(In my head that reads as friendly, conversational sharing of information directly. Its not meant to sound dick-ish. I don't know how else to say it. I swear, it sounded nice in my head. Mostly).
I used to run nothing but 93 and in the beginning my H2 with the first to have the cat cut off, install an Akropivic de restricted by Don Guhl and I run Brock's timing maps also....well I will tell you I switched to 89 Shell after reading one of Brock's posts. Well it was a simply amazing different bike. You could feel the power no question. I put 1000 miles on it running shell at the end of the season. I just pulled my plugs just to get a look see if I had any detanation and there was no sign what so ever. I'm not telling anyone to use 89 just stating my experience.....
 
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I have to answer "yes, but.." on certain points. I don't doubt Brock's claim about the 89 octane making the best power on the dyno. This may have been with a cold motor, on a cool day, and perfect air. One thing all of us have discovered is that the H2 loses power as it heats up. One time I had my bike on the dyno on a hot, humid day and the operator asked what gas I had and I said pump 93. He had me switch to some VP 100 and it did pick up a bit, but still not like it had done on cooler days. The intake temp is critical for making horsepower.
 
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I equate 89 in a hot motor to sweaty dynamite. Yeah, it goes bang just fine, but if you hit it wrong, you're going to regret it.

If you want more power from your fuel, start researching oxygenated stuff and have your bike tuned to that. It increases volatility but at the same time the increased octane (anti-knock index) keeps it stable until your spark plugs actually detonate it on purpose. All high octane race gas does is allow you to increase timing and compression without the fuel prematurely detonating. In my Hendricks stock car the compression was 13.8:1 and I had to run C14+ in it. Cost $400 a tank and was a bit overkill since it ran fine on 100, but it was a lot less expensive than rolling the dice on a motor.

Putting 89 in an H2 is about as foolhardy and ******* as using Everclear. You could get away with 89 in a High-aBusa because they're built like tanks. The H2 is a swiss watch thats already on edge from the lack of an inter/chargecooler. Running 89, regardless of tune or location, is a low rent recipe for disaster.
 

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I don't think anyone on here can disagree with what edinlr said. ...IMO the only reason Kawasaki was able to produce this bike (Supercharged) and sell it now was because the engineers told them it could be safe enough to be abused and not blow up dangerously (relatively). This bike has a knock sensor and the ECU has routines to cope with even imperceptible levels of knock. Which translates into if the octane is too low for existing conditions the ECU will detune to save the motor and so a performance drop occurs that you should feel. The manual calls for 90+ (US) and Shell 89 being top tier probably meets it most of the time anyways so risk of destructive detonation is pretty low in any conditions you'll probably be racing it in. This tech is relatively new to bikes compared to automotive which its been around many years and so we now have more to work with. Once the Woollich pkg releases I'm hoping one of the things you can log is the knock sensor events. Looking at that would help you identify good fuel sources. My wifes car logs knock events the electronics make the difference.
 
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Any word on when Woollich will release a package for the H2
I was told s soon as they get the R1M and new ZX10R stuff done the H2 would be next....they were saying like April.
 
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RSR 1000 PSI Water Injection


Here is a company who has built, tested and raced with various injection products for years. You might find the stuff cheaper elsewhere, but the term, "you get what you pay for", certainly applies here. These guys would be on the short list of people I would use if I was going this way. It would be great if we could cool the mixture down enough to where the bike would still perform as it heated up, or even boost performance a touch.
 

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Good find. That hose connection between the supercharger outlet and the airbox would be a prime spot to put that nozzle, because all the flow has to go through that spot in order to get to all four cylinders. There is someplace on the throttle bodies that has access to the manifold pressure downstream of the throttles - it's part of the system used to activate the blow-off valve - that way it wouldn't activate at higher revs but part throttle.
 

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I think Brock has a little more experience with fuels, than some guy who was banned and is now using a sock puppet account. Just sayin'...
 

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I think Brock has a little more experience with fuels, than some guy who was banned and is now using a sock puppet account. Just sayin'...
Shane, are you picking on me again? Just kidding, after all of these years, I probably know less about gasoline than I do about women and according to my wife, that isn't very much.
 

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Shane, are you picking on me again? Just kidding, after all of these years, I probably know less about gasoline than I do about women and according to my wife, that isn't very much.
LOL, no..."cliff secord" the former self-admitted "H2R". Not picking on anyone, just tired of certain people with no proven experience, running off at the mouth. Adding drama, but little else....that is the playground of these types.
 

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Has anyone here actually ran E85 for an extended amount of time. Seriously considering it, but not sure if the injectors and fuel pump can handle the extra volume needed to pump the amount of enthnol required for a power gain. I am changing the fuel lines to a enthnol resistant ones. I'm not sure if the fuel injector o-rings and tank gasket can handle enthnol. I would love not being the lab rat on this one.
 

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Has anyone here actually ran E85 for an extended amount of time. Seriously considering it, but not sure if the injectors and fuel pump can handle the extra volume needed to pump the amount of enthnol required for a power gain. I am changing the fuel lines to a enthnol resistant ones. I'm not sure if the fuel injector o-rings and tank gasket can handle enthnol. I would love not being the lab rat on this one.

For maximum performance with E85, you want to have your fuel system sized for the fuel. Without getting that balance, you probably won't see a bit of improvement and may hurt your performance. Unless you plan to spend a lot of time on the dyno working on the ECU, the injectors, the fuel pump, and the fuel regulator, you just won't see it. Best advice is to wait for Don Guhl to give us some guidelines on this.
 
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