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Discussion Starter #1
Maintenance for the H2 should follow the same basic principles as natural bikes, however they're not completely identical...

Oil

Supercharging creates extreme conditions inside the motor, it forces extra air into the system creating larger explosions. Because of these larger combustion events more stress is introduced to the internals. Oil is the one key defence to keep things operating smoothly. Changing your oil promptly and staying on top of fluid levels is even more paramount with a supercharger.

Fuel

The H2 is likely to demand premium fuel, as boost increase the higher the octane fuel is demanded to prevent detonation. Detonation has the potential to cause fracturing of the piston rings, pitting the piston and heat distress.

Coolant

Because of the extra heat generated supercharged engines are extremely dependant on their cooling systems, the intercooler is your main defence but make sure to keep your coolant in top condition, and don't forget to keep tabs on your temp gauge.

Air Filters

Important to every engine and exacerbated by adding a supercharger. If the blower isn't breathing properly it leads to inefficiencies and puts a larger strain on the system.

Transmission

The point of transfer for all that extra power to the road, while nothing specific to supercharged vehicles just ensure your tranny service is meticulous and on time.

Belts/Chains

Just like your drive chain your blower chain/belt will require periodic lubrication (chain) and maintenance. Belts do fray and chains stretch, keep tabs.

These minor points are intended to be a jumping off point for discussion. As we get to know more about the H2 this thread can become more and more robust!
 

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One great thing about a factory built positive aspirated system is that Kaw built this bike to be just as reliable as a normal bike.

Super drive is by Hy-Vo steel chain running in a pressure lubed jet bath, same as the tranny. It has an auto chain adjuster so no maintenance is needed.

No intercooler means no extra fluid or weight.

Actually more power means bigger gears than non blown and again a pressurized oil rail with overhead jets will lube the tranny better than current systems. No special maintence is needed but like all bikes, do not coast with the engine off as no oil will lube the input/output shafts which equals pain + money.

Modern engines don't leak/burn oil these days (except for the Panigale) so nothing special here either.

But the one big deal is break-in the bike according to your owners manual, please don't do that silly s*** about run it hard to break it in so the rings seal, utter BS.
Do what the engineers at Kaw say to do, not some self proclaimed motor builder.

Listen...I don't want to sound like some know-it-all and when I write these suggestions it's not that I have some big ego issue, the things I say have been proven to me and many others and I would love to see you all have a great experience with this very cool bike.

I broke my back about 8 years ago and have had to limit myself to two bikes moneywise but I sure as **** would be right down at the dealers with money in hand if I had it. If I had children I'd sell them if I could! This way I can enjoy your experiences with this groundbreaking bike that regular folks can buy and enjoy.
 

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Was ready to mention that it didn't need a intercooler when I realized the second post was yours and you mentioned it not having one. It was a major point of debate if it would or wouldn't have an intercooler. The air must not be super heated enough to need it. Apparentlynot enough compression. Or.. Maybe there is enought boost and heatin the air to need it but... The extra weight hurt power worse than the hot air being intook. Also worth noting is there beefed up oil cooler. It will help a ton in cooling the sc
 

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FWIW, I plan on following the owners manual and Kawasaki's maintenence procedures and schedule.

When someone offers me advice I just ask them what the ring end gap on my engine is. If they don't know I suggest that the people that do know what it is, and why it is that number - well, they wrote down how to break in and maintain my motorcycle in a nice easy to read format for me - the owners manual.

Having said that - I look forward to any assistance I can get in terms of maintaining my H2. I expect that it'll be fairly straightforward but I really don't know yet. I will get the dealer to do the first service for sure, after that I might do them myself.

Greg
 

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I think when folks do the hard "dyno break in" they claim peak power increases at the possible (every situation is different) expense of reliability. I am going on my own experience with this but I believe it's more of a tradoff than anything else. There are very respectable shop owners/dealers who perform these break ins.

Now having said that I didn't rev mine till I changed the oil 3 times and it had 1200 miles so keep that in mind when you read above paragraph.
 

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I went the same route that every turbo builder does when faced with where to put an intercooler on a streetbike and found there just was no way.

I spent hours measuring temps both ambient and airbox after messing with airflow around the engine. It involves a whole lot of boring details but I did manage to get an airbox to ambient offset of about 20 degrees F. (airbox pressurized air was 20 degrees hotter than outside temps).

Not great but I found that I had soooo much extra hp that I could not use, that it didn't matter in the end.

I put a pic of the kaw on my album and you can see I located the turbo way down low in front of the engine and with a fair amount of aluminum tubing the clean airflow was enough to keep it kinda cool.
 

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What @Fretka said is what I like about this bike, being a bike that comes from the factory with forced induction, we have much better chances at having a bike that's much more reliable as i'm sure that is part of Kawi's focus, they don't want to have this turn into a disaster.
 

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Did you actually install a thermometer in the air box? I always feel like the intake air is always a bit hotter than ambient. Even after a long ride to flush it out and cool it down. I think it's because of the heat from the engine. I do enjoy checking ambient vs actual coolant temp. I like to see the similarities. It's neat when it's cool enough out that the radiator barely is used. Think it begins to function at around 149ish degrees f on my 10 on cold days it just hovers around that temp. On hot days it feels like a blowtorch on my legs and the 10 isn't AS bad at displacing heat. Of course hp makes heat so 2 180 hp bikes should put off similar/same amount of heat but some companies are better at channeling heat by the rider cough cough Kawi and some are worse throat clear bmw on the s1k as that sucker is freaking hot. But the 10 ain't exactly "cool" so I won't throw rocks from my glass house
 

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Yep, but that was pretty easy to do and your right, post compressor intake charge is much hotter as you say.
The real problem which turned out to be a blessing was Kaw used all sorts of plastic pieces to duct hot air away from the rider and not worrying about external cool air flow around the engine (which was a pain but also allowed me to modify air flow by deleting/ modifying these pieces).
The worst offender and greatest gain in cooling came from special ducting I used to direct cool air between the top of the engine/airbox and below the tank. Kaw had that area blocked off completely.

I've still got a photo diary of the build if enough people want to see what it took. I just need to find somewhere to post them so I can transfer them to this board.
 

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The way these manufacturers deal with heat fascinates me. Hopefully this H2 won't burn all youse guys legs lol if my 10r is a sign of things to come you'll be fine. Them days that get to 90 could get toasty. I can only imagine the thought that goes into sc or tc a na bike that was in no way meant for it. The extra heat must be insane.
 

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Breaking in a new engine, I was told that you must put the engine through heat, and stress cycles. Like others have mentioned, high RPM to low RPM. A good blast, then just
going through the gears in normal riding. Shut off engine let it fully cool off. The piston
rings will seat better, with less chance of blow by. If you baby the engine too much, the
rings will not seat properly.

I did this with my R1's and my Gixxer 1000. They all ran excellent, and never had an engine
issues. One major thing to remember is to do the first oil & filter change at around 400-500
miles. I found a lot of micro particles of steel and aluminum in the first change. You have to
remember the oil is circulating through the gears (clutch assembly) and the engine itself, so
metal particles will build up fast.
 

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I broke my back about 8 years ago and have had to limit myself to two bikes moneywise but I sure as **** would be right down at the dealers with money in hand if I had it. If I had children I'd sell them if I could! This way I can enjoy your experiences with this groundbreaking bike that regular folks can buy and enjoy.


Fretka,
You can ride me H2 as soon as I break it in. Depending on where you are located I may just ride up to your place.
 

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Fretka,
You can ride me H2 as soon as I break it in. Depending on where you are located I may just ride up to your place.
That was a really nice thing to say so thanks, I appreciate the offer and I am pretty far away but you never know. Be safe and enjoy!

Bruce
 

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I was reading that servicing the H2/H2R begins with a Max Record function that stores the bike's maximum speed, rpm, and intake boost, for easy retrieval. In addition, the H2R has a maintenance schedule supported by a warning system that tracks accumlated hours of over-8,000 rpm use and displays warnings when that time has added up to 15 and then 30 hours, with the H2R service manual specifying replacement of the connecting rods and exhaust valves at 60 hours. Both bikes also have supercharger checks at 7,500 and 15,000 miles, with the throttle body's being removed to access the supercharger's filter. The H2R schedule recommends very frequent replacement of the drive chain, fuel pump, rear wheel rubber dampers, and the transmission output shaft bearing. This on top of the usual oil and filter etc, if this is accurate information it will not be a cheap bike to run.
 

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I was reading that servicing the H2/H2R begins with a Max Record function that stores the bike's maximum speed, rpm, and intake boost, for easy retrieval. In addition, the H2R has a maintenance schedule supported by a warning system that tracks accumlated hours of over-8,000 rpm use and displays warnings when that time has added up to 15 and then 30 hours, with the H2R service manual specifying replacement of the connecting rods and exhaust valves at 60 hours. Both bikes also have supercharger checks at 7,500 and 15,000 miles, with the throttle body's being removed to access the supercharger's filter. The H2R schedule recommends very frequent replacement of the drive chain, fuel pump, rear wheel rubber dampers, and the transmission output shaft bearing. This on top of the usual oil and filter etc, if this is accurate information it will not be a cheap bike to run.

You are correct, the H2 luckily will be cheaper. It's no different than owning a high end car i.e. Porsche, Ferrari, Lambo, etc. The type of maintenance and the intervals are more stringent than the typical auto. This is just part of the experience of owning a bike of this caliber.
 

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Your are correct, the H2 luckily will be cheaper. It's no different than owning a high end car i.e. Porsche, Ferrari, Lambo, etc. The type of maintenance and the intervals are more stringent than the typical auto. This is just part of the experience of owning a bike of this caliber.
Agreed, just putting it out there. My Kawasaki dealer has sent one of his technicians on the H2 training course already. He has to check the bikes upon delivery from the warehouse, sign for them, carry out the PDI and is the only person allowed to work on them. Kawasaki are taking this bike very seriously.
 

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Agreed, just putting it out there. My Kawasaki dealer has sent one of his technicians on the H2 training course already. He has to check the bikes upon delivery from the warehouse, sign for them, carry out the PDI and is the only person allowed to work on them. Kawasaki are taking this bike very seriously.
If this is the case, then the question would be can any Kawi dealer can work on one?
 

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If this is the case, then the question would be can any Kawi dealer can work on one?
Probably any one that has someone or some people certified for working on it.

I'd imagine that all or most dealers would see to it that they have people trained in doing this.
 

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Probably any one that has someone or some people certified for working on it.

I'd imagine that all or most dealers would see to it that they have people trained in doing this.
Hopefully that's the case.

If sending someone was optional, depending if the dealship sold one, then it may hit or miss...
 
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