Ninja H2 banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not so much a "build" (and it will be nothing like the amazing project of OzBooster) but a place to post all my silly LSR questions in one thread which might also help other salty virgins in the future.

I'm planning on running a fairly stock H2R on the salt in South Australia and know I could learn a lot from the guys here who have been tinkering for 12 months or more.

Gearing:
I have read a lot of older H2 threads on sprockets and it seems the 19/41 is as tall as you can go.
Is that right?

Tyres:
I have no idea. The more questions I ask and the more I read the more confused I am. I saw that the team 38 boys at Bonny ran Dunlop GP tyres but later cut more tread in them. Listening to the video they posted online you could hear excessive tyre spin (or clutch slip) in the top of each gear range.
What rubber do you think works best on the salt?

Bracket:
I have poured over the rule book on dlra.org.au and thought the H2R would fit into M-BG but then read an off-topic thread here that made me look at "M" as naked bikes as opposed to "no additional streamlining" which is how I read it first. While the H2 can go into the production category the H2R wasn't produced for the street so...
I'm thinking now the H2R sits in MPS-BG?

Salt:
Looks like nasty stuff. Thinking that a clear wrap on the paint might be worthwhile along with a rear hugger at least.
Any tips on the best way to keep stuff "pretty" after a week on the salt?

Sorry for so many questions but I promise I'll appreciate any tips I can get that will help make my first trip to the salt a fun one.


Andy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
674 Posts
Hey Andy , that will make 3 of us out there next yr that know of but only you with the R

First big warning is dont take the damage salt can do lightly , i use a lot of lanolin spray on my bikes, and pretty much tear then down after , i dont repeatedly wash them on the salt , i think adding water just helps it get into the hard to get at places, the stuff wicks up , hugger helps aero and keeps things cleaner
Traction will be a big issue , any weight you can add helps, dont put it too low or too far back, centralised mass is the key , its sort of like tieing the bike down on the dyno , lots of guys cant get there head around adding weight to go fast .

I think you will be MPS/BG or BF too but talk to Gray Hadley the bike tech (details in DLRA website ), he is Melbourne based and will confirm
removing the forward body work will put you in M , and you will loose about 20 mph , but its an interesting ride
I am aiming at APS if the bodywork comes together in time

If you have it setup right you will be selecting rubber based on speed capability not how soft it is, real soft rubber chunks , it never warms up and can cold tear , surface is usually damp to some degree and it just sucks the temp out of a tire , i use BT003 as they have been sucessfully used over 250mph often, Another rider i know that often runs above 250mph uses the Dunlop Daytona compound GPA or N tec

With the R i believe you can get different ratios for the gearbox otherwise look at Bear Racing for there overdrive gears, then you can get a better suited range with readily available sprockets

if you want to chat about the salt any time my number is 0428655445
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Some awesome leads and info thanks Oz.

Removing bodywork... yeah, I'm guessing a naked H2R would be an interesting ride indeed. I'm surprised the front bodywork is only good for 20mph (I have a lot to learn)

I have fond memories of BT002's on the Z1000 at Winton, Phillip Island and the Great Ocean Road. Amazing on the black stuff so I would be happy to give the BT003 a go for the salt.

I didn't know about the transmission gears, ta. Not sure I can get my head around stripping the gearbox on a bike I've not run-in yet, I think I was more interested in keeping the bike pretty stock and just change sprockets for my first trip out... but I'm sure now I know it will give me a twitch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks heaps for the link to that Kawiguy454.

It was a long but good read. Interesting to go through 15 pages which started off a bit nasty and heated but had some great ideas in the middle. Sorry to see Nola has been cornered into legal action... lawyers will be the real winners there.

I bought this secondhand, and it's a "R" which stands for Really? No warranty on this one dude".

I'll certainly get some killrust into there and plug it. Ta.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm thinking along with clear wrap for painted parts things like the rims might benefit from a good coat of plastidip when I change the tyres (and balanced of course).



Any one used plastidip with any success?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
The question about which class to run in is a tough one. My H2 was put in the P-PB-1000 class at our recent records meetings, I'm not an expert in SCTA classes but your H2R is still a production machine, just not road-legal.

I guess it also depends on what modifications you do to your H2R. Maybe ask the event organisers for some advice. My club, Straightliners, had never had an H2 enter an event before mine and there was a bit of head-scratching before they gave me my class.

Since the H2R doesn't have mirrors, it has wings as a stock fitment, you won't be removing them and shouldn't be in the MPS class, unless you make other mods. It should qualify to go into the PB class too, it's production supercharged not an aftermarket blower.

I too would be interested to see what older and wiser heads say about this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Bob
The DLRA rulebook is available for download which is great for us... maybe less use for you in the UK
Rule Book - Dry Lakes Racers Australia

Here, the H2R breaks the "street-legal motorcycles" in the first sentence.

Code:
7.E PRODUCTION 
This class is limited to production, street-legal motorcycles of which 500 or more have been produced
and which are available for sale to the general public through retail motorcycle dealers. Motorcycles in
this class shall be equipped with full lighting equipment, frame, forks, wheels, brakes, gas and oil tank (if
OEM), fenders and seat. The motorcycle must appear identical in all respects to the production model it
represents, including the intake air box and exhaust system. The exhaust system, looking at the end
(down its centerline) shall be unmodified, i.e. the exit diameter of the canister (muffler) cannot be
enlarged. This comparison will be made when the bike is assembled as ready to run. Any performance
modifications shall be out of view.
Custom painting or decal removal does not violate the production class appearance rule however
smoothing, filling, removal of badges, emblems or garnish trim or other physical changes are not
permitted.  Production class records are subject to approval and will be certified ONLY after comparison
with the manufacturer’s specifications for the model.  The entrant is required to provide suitable
documentation substantiating the production design of the entry at the time of the record certification 
inspection.
So...
P-PB-1000 nearly makes sense for you in Australia but I would have doubts that your aftermarket slip-on exhaust meets the Aussie production rules above.
(just my reading of it)

Code:
7.F MODIFIED PRODUCTION- M, MPS 
The Modified Class is intended for “modified” production models and not purpose-built racing bikes.
This class includes all On Road, On-Off Road and Off Road only models and limited production models
(more than 50). 
This class does not include factory produced road racing or any other specialized racing or models
UNLESS AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC.
As I read it the H2R just sneaks into the above, as it was a factory produced road racing specialised (specialised with a s not a z) model that IS available to public (if they are silly enough to spend that much).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Okay LSR and track day people, a couple of questions...

1: Can anyone please tell me how to safety wire the counter-sunk allen-keyed front axle bolts on the bottom of the fork leg?
I've never safety wired anything but it appears fairly straight forward, I've just ordered the pliers and wire but I can't guess how to wire those two.

2: Glycol
Does everyone actually remove the coolant from their radiators? I'm guessing anything green has glycol so I would guess Mr Kawasaki used glycol and I'll have to flush it too.

Something like:
Flush:
RADIATOR FLUSH

Coolant:
10 TENTHS RACE COOLANT INHIBITOR (NO GLYCOL)


Thoughts appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
Hi Bob
The DLRA rulebook is available for download which is great for us... maybe less use for you in the UK
Rule Book - Dry Lakes Racers Australia

Here, the H2R breaks the "street-legal motorcycles" in the first sentence.

Code:
7.E PRODUCTION 
This class is limited to production, street-legal motorcycles of which 500 or more have been produced
and which are available for sale to the general public through retail motorcycle dealers. Motorcycles in
this class shall be equipped with full lighting equipment, frame, forks, wheels, brakes, gas and oil tank (if
OEM), fenders and seat. The motorcycle must appear identical in all respects to the production model it
represents, including the intake air box and exhaust system. The exhaust system, looking at the end
(down its centerline) shall be unmodified, i.e. the exit diameter of the canister (muffler) cannot be
enlarged. This comparison will be made when the bike is assembled as ready to run. Any performance
modifications shall be out of view.
Custom painting or decal removal does not violate the production class appearance rule however
smoothing, filling, removal of badges, emblems or garnish trim or other physical changes are not
permitted.  Production class records are subject to approval and will be certified ONLY after comparison
with the manufacturer’s specifications for the model.  The entrant is required to provide suitable
documentation substantiating the production design of the entry at the time of the record certification 
inspection.
So...
P-PB-1000 nearly makes sense for you in Australia but I would have doubts that your aftermarket slip-on exhaust meets the Aussie production rules above.
(just my reading of it)

Code:
7.F MODIFIED PRODUCTION- M, MPS 
The Modified Class is intended for “modified” production models and not purpose-built racing bikes.
This class includes all On Road, On-Off Road and Off Road only models and limited production models
(more than 50). 
This class does not include factory produced road racing or any other specialized racing or models
UNLESS AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC.
As I read it the H2R just sneaks into the above, as it was a factory produced road racing specialised (specialised with a s not a z) model that IS available to public (if they are silly enough to spend that much).
That's good information, thanks. Here in the UK the Akrapovic slip-on is supplied by Kawasaki with the bike. Hopefully P-PB-1000 would work here. Straightliners have accepted it and I have a standing-mile and flying kilo class record.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's good information, thanks. Here in the UK the Akrapovic slip-on is supplied by Kawasaki with the bike. Hopefully P-PB-1000 would work here. Straightliners have accepted it and I have a standing-mile and flying kilo class record.
Well done on your records...Nice!
Yeah, I can see that you could argue that the can came with the bike, I didn't know about that.

Drill Allen head bolts at an angle do the same for the axle and wire tie together. I did the rear by drilling the very end of each lug nut on every flat. I drained my coolant and used Engine Ice
Thanks for the reply and pictures slpman, gives me a great starting point.

It's a work of art too. Allen heads at an angle makes more sense to me now and yeah, that's a great way to pick-up the axle. I didn't realise the rear wheel nuts needed wiring, I'll have to have another look through the rules.

What did you do for the button-head allen sump plug? (doesn't look like enough meat there to get a hole).
Replace it with a drilled hex-head maybe?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
That's the same bolt I used.
I used a hose clamp on the oil filter and wire tied the filter to the sump bolt. It kills two birds by stopping both the filter and sump bolt from coming loose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well everything is wired-up and looking great.

Should have bought shares in a drill company before drilling everything, lots of broken bits on those harder metals even in a drill-press with lots of cutting oil and slow progress. Done now though!

Leaves me with the next question...

Battery box for LSR?

Seems our rules are:
All batteries shall be properly secured with metal hold-downs, framework and fasteners. Plastic tie-downs are not allowed. OEM battery hold-downs may not be adequate.

I see that Brock sells a "steel strap" to replace the rubber OEM one in the USA but when talking to the AU tech-inspector they seem to need a whole box around the battery.

Seems a dumb rule when the battery is under-seat in a plastic moulded compartment and can't go anywhere when the seat is on and I suspect this is really more a car rule that ended in the bike section.

What do others do to meet our LSR regulations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
674 Posts
Usually put a strap under, over and around , not difficult to make something that fits within the original holder
just be sure it cant short to the terminals , and if you have a Li battery it has a sound case ,
I scratched one that had visible batterys (not realy in a case) with the hold down clamp doing a mates R1, resembled a Samsung 7 pretty quick , best i could do was cut the cables and take it out to a bare area to burn itself out without breathing the fumes

I think the rule is there for the earth -sky-earth-sky thing

Your getting it done, mine is apart for a checkup , replace some bearings that have signs of abuse and ceramic coat the pistons , if i dont just replace them with better
No bearings or rod bolts in Australia either but easy to order from the US
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
Well everything is wired-up and looking great.

Should have bought shares in a drill company before drilling everything, lots of broken bits on those harder metals even in a drill-press with lots of cutting oil and slow progress. Done now though!

Leaves me with the next question...

Battery box for LSR?

Seems our rules are:
All batteries shall be properly secured with metal hold-downs, framework and fasteners. Plastic tie-downs are not allowed. OEM battery hold-downs may not be adequate.

I see that Brock sells a "steel strap" to replace the rubber OEM one in the USA but when talking to the AU tech-inspector they seem to need a whole box around the battery.

Seems a dumb rule when the battery is under-seat in a plastic moulded compartment and can't go anywhere when the seat is on and I suspect this is really more a car rule that ended in the bike section.

What do others do to meet our LSR regulations?
Thank goodness we don't have that level of scrutineering here in the UK (yet).

I've never been asked about the battery and neither have I been required to fit a metal chain guard. Lock-wiring is needed for our race tracks and then it's usually just the sump plug for a production bike on a track day, race bikes are different of course but it's not yet needed in LSR.

Having said that, the bike has to be perfect in every respect before getting that important signature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Wow, what a week. Heat, sunburn, rain.... we got it all.

Great people, interesting machinery and an awesome sound-track of tortured motors on the brink of turning into a pile of bolts. How could you not love this sport!

The salt is an amazing thing to see, every morning we drove to the lake from the camp-ground at sunrise to see the light change. It was jaw dropping awe every single day... surreal, alien-planet esk and also nice and cool before the blistering sun beat down on us 40C (105F) in the shade (good luck finding shade out there too!).

The first couple of days we did our licence passes, you need to prove you can handle the speed before you can go flat out.

Day 1:
First pass on the salt. Not nervous but seriously excited and a tad anxious to see what it was like to ride on this stuff. Speed limited to 200kmh (125mph). It was like running on velvet, beautiful, smooth and better than any road I have driven on.

Second pass: Now I'm allowed to go to a 240kmh (150mph) limit. Ahh, that feels faster, still smooth and nice.


Day 2:
With the first two licences out of the way I'm allowed to do 280kmh (175mph). Woah, that feel fast. Front wheel moving around on the salt, back wheel spin and little fish-tails and a huge lump of salt hitting me in the helmet from under the speedo. Now it feels like I'm riding and I can see how much everything changes with a small speed increase.

280kmh (175mph) licence out of the way and I'm allowed to go 320kmh (200mph). First pass, flat out through the 2mile, 3mile, 4mile... tacho up to 12,000rpm then a flash to 14,000... lighting-up the back wheel. Tons of power, can't get it down. 300kmh (188mph) top speed.

Day 3:
After talking to Ben (Yamaha R1) and Sam (ZX14) they said "stiffen it up!". So I changed the geometry, stiffer front, stiffer rear, pre-load, dampening and rebound. Ran again... 295kmh (185mph), still getting wheel spin in the top end. Arrgghhh.
Check the bike over and can see a slight discolouration in the oil... hmm... this is clutch slip, not wheel spin this time. So pulled the clutch out and inspected all the plates. None burnt, just slipping. Spent the rest of the day scrounging heavier springs or washers to pad the existing springs.

Day 4:
OzBooster to the rescue! He found some spacer washers in the back of his clutch on a bike that smoked a piston earlier in the day and ran them up to me. Legend! I installed the washers and went out again. 295kmh (185mph). Wheel spin this time, not clutch slip. Then the heavens opened and we got soaked... racing called off for the day.


Day 5:
After sitting around the camp site pondering most the night, I decided to try removing the top wings. Less down force on the front means more weight transfer to the rear. We were on the lake at sunrise but there was a lot of water on the start line from the night before. It was a late start, they moved the startline to the 2 mile mark and could run "short track" for the morning. First pass... 319kmh (198mph) top speed with wheel spin and fish-tails but WOW, that was fun.

Got back, grabbed the time slip and rode down to the start for another pass. 319kmh (198.238mph - exactly the same to the 1000th as the previous run).

Being only one and a half miles off the 200mph mark I rode down to the start line for a third pass but Peter the starter said "sorry, all done". Arrgghh. So close yet 12 months away from the next pass.

Punchline: a couple of 319kmh (198.238mph) passes and I now have a 200mph "A Grade Licence" so I can drive/ride anything at stupid speeds without qualifying again.

We have lots of photos and video that we haven't had a chance to look through yet (got back to work and have been shoveling the backlog ever since)

I do have some Race Chrono footage from the last pass on my phone and have just uploaded it to Youtube. Sound is bad (wind noise) but you can see the GPS speed, G-meter and see the tacho needle (14,000 is straight-up).

2 minute YouTube Video - on board the H2R:

https://youtu.be/ALpJbMEBUz8

I'll upload more stuff when we sort through it.

Thanks heaps and heaps to OzBooster, without you scrounging those washers our week would have ended frustrated in the middle.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top