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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys...I would like to lower my frontend.I don't track ride my bike.But I would like a bit more turn-in performance.Nothing radical.Can someone help me here on a drop number in inches?(or mm's if that's easier).Thanks guys...H2 forever!:)
 

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I notice differences of a couple millimeters at a time. Don't make large adjustments.

Try winding the preload out a couple of turns before you actually loosen the triple clamps to do it that way.

If the geometry is correct, mid-corner it should feel as if you could take your hands off the bars and it will continue on the same path without straightening up and without falling in.

If you have stock rear ride height and the rider-aboard sag front and rear is in the vicinity of where it should be, and the tires are in good shape and the correct sizes, stock front ride height is pretty close to where it should be. It's close enough that I'd suggest juggling preload a.k,a, rider-aboard sag before changing the actual ride height settings. In other words, don't change it by more than a few (5?) millimeters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay...that's excellent advice.I heard 5 mm was just about right.Okay...thanks GoFaster.Awesome!
I'm just now replacing the stock bars with the Kawasaki upward angle bars.All the stuff is out of the way.Thanks again...H2..
 

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I weigh about 188lbs (been losing weight this summer), and with the front end lowered exactly 5mm and sag set how I like it, 30mm front/29mm rear, she feels more planted, stable mid-corner, and yet compliant. I am very happy with how she handles, the overall best suspension that I have felt on a streetbike. I dialed the front end drop first, then set sag at both ends with the comp and rebound backed all the way off, once sag was set, I then returned the comp and rebound to the stock settings, added basically 1-click more comp and re-bound front and rear, then test rode for compliance and feel. She handles like magic in my book, literally feels hard wired to my cortex.
:)
 

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As an experienced track rider, I often opt to never touch the front unless absolutely necessary. Think of it this way, the front is twice as sensitive to adjustments than the rear.

See what happens is that when you lower the front, you increase your braking distance. Sometimes the bike can even feel like it's standing on it's nose while braking and it saps your confidence when going fast.

With that said, I'm not exactly telling you not to touch your forks, but maybe try firming up the suspension and running a taller tire. I run the GPA Pro 190/60 and that's an extra 5mm in the rear. Plus the narrower profile of the 190 vs the 200 really gets the bike turning nice.


One other thing to keep in mind is that when you put more weight on the front, the bike is less likely to forgive you if you make errors. For example, trail braking too hard or too long. It won't tolerate slick roads as well either.

On a good day, I can run mid-pack Advanced/Expert Group on my H2 with basically stock settings. However, at one point, I felt the same way and started to wonder if I needed to play with the front geometry. In the end, I just needed to grow some balls and ride faster. Riding faster required that I brake harder, which in turn compressed the front end more and made the bike turn faster. Just some food for thought.

These are just my opinions though. Ultimately, you are the one who has to find a comfortable setting.

Stock Settings. ;)
 

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Agree with most of Turbo

A different type profile will help a little, best way forward imo is to raise the rear as this helps with ground clearance too, unfortunately the 15/16 models have no rear ride height adjuster, I presume the 17 can be done with the Ohlins shock so you have to go for Brocks "dogbone" adjusters or raise the forks slightly

I have raised mine by 5mm and it does make a noticeable difference, dont go to far though as you will reduce stability

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Okay...yeah...that's what I was kinda hoping to generate with this.I'm leaving it stock.I do have the 190's on there...always.For street riding,sometimes pretty fast curves and all,I think the geometry is well done.I don't like changing things like that actually.Thanks you all....very cool.My 'problem' is that I've never owned a 1000 before...and I know this one's heavier than most...so I've really no idea what a 'lighter' bike would feel like.It's fine as far as I'm concerned.I haven't had any problem with handling that I can tell.She stays right where I point her.
Takes the curves and such really solidly.Thanks again.
 

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Hi. I have raised the rear on my '15 by fitting a different set of rear shock mount plates. The rear shock eye is 5mm lower than standard, which may equate to maybe 10mm of ride height change. Along with that, I raised the forks 5mm in the yolks (lowered the front). The changing of direction was night and day. It would hold a line so much better under acceleration too.
I have yet to install a set of Brocks adjustable links but I'll be setting them up to the current rear ride height as a start.

Keeping in mind the bike was designed more for stability at speed and acceleration, there is scope for change. I have not had any moments at all with my changes, even on bumpy roads, full acceleration.

For reference, I've had heaps of other sports bikes and have pretty much put a 5-10mm spacer in every rear shock mount to sharpen the steering. The H2 standard was just too lazy for my liking.
 
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