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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gents,

Here is a writeup on what you will encounter when installing Brocks heavy duty springs on the 2016 H2. It will be different on the 2015 models. This is prob the most simple thing to do on the bike, and if you are putting down big HP you might need it.

You will need:

Clutch cover gasket- 11061-0944
Kawasaki RTV (TB1211F : 92104-004) for three places on the clutch cover
Blue Locktite
Torque wrench capable of going low enough to register:
106 in-lb (12N-m) for the clutch cover
97 in-lb (11N-m) for the clutch spring bolts
#5 hex T-handle and #5 to fit the torque wrench
10mm socket
A little bit of 10W-40 for what leaks out when its on its sidestand
Of course...Three new springs.
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1. Put a garbage bag down to catch a little bit of oil that will leak. (Do this on its sidestand, not wheel chock)

2. Remove right side fairing

3. Take out your cell phone and take a picture of the entire cover, and then specifically the three brackets all around it. Lowers your odds of screwing this up.

4. Loosen all of the #5 hex around the cover. At the two O'Clock position one of them will be difficult because it has Locktite on it. The rest will spin free out of the cover. Last chance to take a pic of the brackets.

5. Remove the brackets and the bolts.

6. Grab the clutch cover and pop it off. Some oil will flow out.

7. Looking in your face is three 10mm bolts holding a three sided plate in place. The springs are under this. Loosen the bolts a little at a time (imagine the opposite you do when you torque things in place criss cross). They are very long and it might take a couple min if you do it right and remove the tension slowly and symmetrically.

8. Once the bolts are all the way out, pull them out, take off the plate and swap stock springs for new springs.

9. Ok, here is where you either need a friend, or creativity. Brocks springs are quite longer than the stock, meaning you will have to really compress the three sided plate to get the bolts to start in place. Option one, have a friend grab the plate with his/her thumbs and press it in against the clutch drum while you start all three bolts. Option two if you dont have a helper, do one bolt, get it more than just "started" so it has full purchase on the threads, then insert the next spring and spin the plate to it and compress it and install bolt...But the third spring is now really tricky, just insert it and wiggle it or turn it and it will go in place and then put the bolt in and start it.

10. Use your 10mm wrench to turn them equally the same way you took them out. A little bit at a time going around till the plate is flush.

11. Torque to 97in-lb (11N-m).

12. Clean all of the old gasket off of the cover and engine. BE CAREFUL on the right side, at 3 O'clock, that you dont scrape or damage the crank sensor wire going thru the case.

13. Open the shop manual and go to section 6-16 and look at the three places they want RTV to be placed and then blue locktite on one of the bolts.

14. Install the gasket and cover, and then put the Locktite bolt in its 3 O'clock place, so you dont forget where it goes.

15. Install the brackets and all of the bolts. Using the shop manual section 6-16 follow the torque order and torque to 106In-lb (12N-m).

16. Check and add engine oil.

17. Ride.
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Hope this helps. The list is not all encompassing, but pretty close.

NOLA
 

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Good write up Nola but how do I check and add engine oil LMAO
 
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I purchased the springs and gasket but have reservations about doing the installation because the clutch works so well the way it is and don?t know if it will cause the clutch lever to be too stiff. I have dragraced 10 Times with speeds to 151 mph and run 6 passes in a half mile speed event reaching 193 mph with no slippage with the stick clutch. I have a Brock?s stage 2 and with the updated 2016 clutch I don?t know if stiffer springs are necessary. How is your clutch lever with the new springs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The difference is noticeable but not bad at all. I'd say a bit stiffer but not overwhelming.

If you already have the gasket and springs do the change. You dont even have to put it back together. Just take it apart, put the new springs in, and get on the bike and test feel it a few times. If you like it, put the bike back together. If you dont like it, put the stock springs back in and put it back together.

Its such a quick simple swap you can even ride it a bit with the new springs in and if you dont like it, then its only $27 bucks for a new gasket and the learning experiment.

NOLA
 

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Good write-up.

I put the Brock's clutch kit on my 14. Not done the H2 yet. Mine's a 2015 and the clutch is heavy enough already and I don't think it slips.

With the installation of the longer springs would it be possible to buy three longer bolts, do them up a couple of turns just to get the plate in place and then swap them one at a time for the correct bolts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@BobC

Yes, I think so. It wasn't really really hard to do it one at a time like I described, just have to be careful and take your time. Longer bolts would work too, and then swap them out. I honestly think it took longer to RTV and prep the gasket and cover for reinstall than to swap the springs.

NOLA
 

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Good write-up.

I put the Brock's clutch kit on my 14. Not done the H2 yet. Mine's a 2015 and the clutch is heavy enough already and I don't think it slips.

With the installation of the longer springs would it be possible to buy three longer bolts, do them up a couple of turns just to get the plate in place and then swap them one at a time for the correct bolts?
You have to make sure the longer bolts don't bottom out, or go through and drag on the basket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@TedG

To be clear I think he meant he would substitute longer bolts just to get the springs compressed with the flange and then put the stock bolts back in place to finish tightening up.

NOLA
 

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@BobC

Yes, I think so. It wasn't really really hard to do it one at a time like I described, just have to be careful and take your time. Longer bolts would work too, and then swap them out. I honestly think it took longer to RTV and prep the gasket and cover for reinstall than to swap the springs.

NOLA
NOLA,

GREAT write-up.

FYI: You are correct, changing the gasket can be more time-consuming than the clutch work! We will reuse today's clutch cover gaskets multiple times. On a bike that gets drag raced, we will use the clutch cover gasket 20+ times, or until they begin to seep. We have gone an entire season with the same gasket.

Today's OEM gaskets are 'AFM style' and already have have sealant applied. It's thin shiny layer that gives the gasket a 'graphite' color.

More info. on AFM:
ALUMINUM FOAMETTE MATERIAL (AFM)
AFM is a chemically blown, compounded nitrile synthetic rubber bonded to an aluminum core with temperature resistance of over 250°F. AFM material has an 85 percent recovery while maintaining strong torque retention. AFM does not require gasket sealers or re-tightening.

Hope this helps,

Brock
Brocks Performance
 
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