Ninja H2 banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone use a hidden GPS tracker or Lojack.

With the limited supply of these bikes, i would imagine they are stolen quite often?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
Yes I have one as it's one of the things my insurance requested and a good thing to do with a bike of this price
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
702 Posts
Does anyone use a hidden GPS tracker or Lojack.

With the limited supply of these bikes, i would imagine they are stolen quite often?
I doubt they are stolen very often. There's no market. It's not like your typical 600cc or Liter bike. Not saying it's impossible but you'd have to be an idiot to try and sell or part out a hot H2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Does anyone use a hidden GPS tracker or Lojack.

With the limited supply of these bikes, i would imagine they are stolen quite often?
Don't think so, they are so few ( here anyway in Oz) what are you gonna do with it? Maybe in countries where they are more prolific might be the case. Either way, the tracker you guys use, where are they placed? How big are they?
Jeffro ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I had one of these GPS units on an earlier bike. For $50 Australian off eBay 3 years ago I reckon I got more than my moneys worth.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
For anyone interested in what it does.

When I purchased the H2, I sent the unit to the dealer so I could track the bikes journey. (The carrier wouldn't give me the destination address within my capital city, route or duration of the trip.) They'd only give me approximate dates for its ETA.

The dealer wired it onto the battery, put it behind the seat and then contacted me when the truck arrived to pick it up. At that time I texted it to awaken and report its gps location. I also set it to alert me when it was travelling more than 80 kph (50 mph) and was outside of a geofence that I had setup for Darwin Australia.

Once it was on its way and I could tell which route it was on, I setup more geofences for major towns so I could be texted when it arrived and departed them. When it finally arrived late one afternoon 4 days and 4200km's (2600 miles) later, I was able to see exactly where it was being stored. Following day I had my trailer all ready and was calling the carrier to ask how soon I could pick it up. :)

When I put on my radiator guard I repositioned it under the front fairing using a simple bracket and fed it a power source. Without a power source the internal battery was good for 12 - 14 hours with light usage. My insurer wouldn't recognise it as an authorised unit which didn't bother me as it wasn't purchased for insurance reductions. I recall they recognised a particular $800 unit as being eligible for a 5% reduction in premiums on a $900 policy.

Anyway, the unit allows you to set it up to do.

1. Disable electrics. Eg Fuel pumps, ignition etc.
2. Setup speed alerts. Eg. Loan your bike (or in my case sons "borrow" a bike) and be alerted if bike exceeds 160 kph.
3. Geofences. Plug in 4 x long/lat coordinates and it creates a geographical fence.
4. Hook unit up to a siren for an audible alarm.
5. GPS coord's texted every nn minutes.
6. Sensitivity alarm. High / Med / Low. Eg Park the bike and arm it. On high or med, if someone were to slightly turn the bars or attempt to sit on it = text.
7. Insert a SD card and it logs to the card in the event you're out of a phone service area. When you're back in service, download the logged data.

It did other stuff too but I can't remember all of it. Only the stuff I used.

There were 4 or 5 models with differing levels of functionality. The cheapest started at around $38 ish.

Nahj
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I had one of these GPS units on an earlier bike. For $50 Australian off eBay 3 years ago I reckon I got more than my moneys worth.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
For anyone interested in what it does.

When I purchased the H2, I sent the unit to the dealer so I could track the bikes journey. (The carrier wouldn't give me the destination address within my capital city, route or duration of the trip.) They'd only give me approximate dates for its ETA.

The dealer wired it onto the battery, put it behind the seat and then contacted me when the truck arrived to pick it up. At that time I texted it to awaken and report its gps location. I also set it to alert me when it was travelling more than 80 kph (50 mph) and was outside of a geofence that I had setup for Darwin Australia.

Once it was on its way and I could tell which route it was on, I setup more geofences for major towns so I could be texted when it arrived and departed them. When it finally arrived late one afternoon 4 days and 4200km's (2600 miles) later, I was able to see exactly where it was being stored. Following day I had my trailer all ready and was calling the carrier to ask how soon I could pick it up. :)

When I put on my radiator guard I repositioned it under the front fairing using a simple bracket and fed it a power source. Without a power source the internal battery was good for 12 - 14 hours with light usage. My insurer wouldn't recognise it as an authorised unit which didn't bother me as it wasn't purchased for insurance reductions. I recall they recognised a particular $800 unit as being eligible for a 5% reduction in premiums on a $900 policy.

Anyway, the unit allows you to set it up to do.

1. Disable electrics. Eg Fuel pumps, ignition etc.
2. Setup speed alerts. Eg. Loan your bike (or in my case sons "borrow" a bike) and be alerted if bike exceeds 160 kph.
3. Geofences. Plug in 4 x long/lat coordinates and it creates a geographical fence.
4. Hook unit up to a siren for an audible alarm.
5. GPS coord's texted every nn minutes.
6. Sensitivity alarm. High / Med / Low. Eg Park the bike and arm it. On high or med, if someone were to slightly turn the bars or attempt to sit on it = text.
7. Insert a SD card and it logs to the card in the event you're out of a phone service area. When you're back in service, download the logged data.

It did other stuff too but I can't remember all of it. Only the stuff I used.

There were 4 or 5 models with differing levels of functionality. The cheapest started at around $38 ish.

Nahj
Hey Nahj thanks so much for the information. I had no idea how useful they are. I wouldn't be using it for insurance purposes either, but after seeing what you wrote I may be interested myself from not only a security point view but for all the other benefits you described...
Thanks again for sharing ...
Jeffro ;)
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top