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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering how others are planning to break in their H2SX.
When I bought my 2013 ZX-6R, I did hard break in and the condition of the bike was perfect til the day I traded the bike in for 2015 Ninja1000. Now that I'm trading in my 1000 for SX SE, I'm kind of leaning toward manufacturer's recommended break in since the price of the bike is about twice as much and I wanna make sure not to void the warranty on it.
 

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I use a progressive break-in avoiding short runs. Gradually increase throttle and revs. The worst thing is to creep around for 600 miles and then give it full throttle. The word on modern engines is that they are good to go after a few heat cycles. It's worth remembering that the initial gentle ride is also to check that everything is screwed together properly, to scrub in tyres and so on.
 

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I rode my H2 for the first 200 miles pretty steady and to the book, after that thought fook it, took it all though the rev range without being stupid;)

Rob
 

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Take is easy the first 200 miles. In other words don't stress the engine hard.
1) Cycle the engine gently accelerate, then back off. Do this over and over again as much as possible.
2) Keep it low RPM say under 4k for the first 50 or so.
3) After the first 50, gentle acceleration but let it rev up occasionally.
4) Never hold one RPM, always cycle the engine speed.
5) Some say within the first 20 miles (make sure you warm up the engine) to accelerate a few times pretty hard. Loading the rings is not a bad idea. Just don't over do it. After the first 20, then be a bit more gentle.
The heat cycling helps the rings maintain their temper(does not create the temper), very important for the first 50, just don't load the engine too hard (no prolonged hard acceleration), let any imperfections wear themselves in.
A little patience helps the engine live a long and happy life.

Oh you could break it in hard and risk the rings not tempering correctly, or risk an imperfection to overheat and cause a seizure that will grow over time and one day cause a catastrophic failure. Maybe it would be fine but why risk it? There is absolutely ZERO evidence that a hard break in helps the engine in any way. Where there are thousands of examples where a hard break in caused a failure, or turned a bike into an "Oil burner".
Just the humble opinion of someone who worked as a motorcycle mechanic (factory trained Kawasaki, Yamaha, Suzuki, Triumph, etc) and has seen what a poor break in can do.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info, very informative?
How about the oil change? Kawasaki Japan recommends first oil change at 1000km, but when I applied hard break in on 6R, I remember doing couple extra oil change before reaching 1000km(I remember seeing tons of metal particles on the first change).
Since I won't be going that hard this time around, maybe I'll do the first oil change at 500 km.
 

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It never hurts to do an extra oil change in the break in period. Probably un-necessary, but can't hurt. But even if you do an extra one, make sure you do one at the suggested interval. The reason for that is the MFG figures that parts will be breaking in and shed material for that first interval. So be sure to get it out. You shouldn't see tons of metal particles. Broken in properly, the particles should be almost invisible. If you see lots, something got beat up more than it should have. That is another side effect of a hard break in.
 

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I think ill just drain the oil filter in in a 10um filter then into 1um and put it back in, i think I have both laying around.
 

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I think I'll follow the mfg's schedule,and change oil and filter when recommended.
That's what I do. Although my H2 is having it's third annual service this week at just 2,300 miles.

After the first 600 or so most of these miles have been up and down runways. It's also on it's third rear Bridgestone and has had many safety checks by the scrutineering team at LSR meetings as well as those done by me.
 

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13K miles on mine...now going on 4th set of buns.

I cheated a bit with my break-in.Within 20 miles I was takin her on up.After that,some heat cycles and running through the rev range.Oil change at 200 mi.She runs strong and smooth.IDK.Mine seems fine.I suspect that break-in schedule is really for an owner that doesn't quite feel okay with the bike.I can see that.Kawasaki sportbikes can be a handful if one's not used to riding one.
 

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Dont think it matters that much. I understand manual has part in it dedicated on how to run in. But thats like covering themselves if anything goes bang. Ive had a few new bikes and played with them all and im of the understanding they are pretty well made nowadays that really it would take some severe sustained throttle to kill a new engine. Ive had to break or run in a few tuned car engines but they were ran in on mineral oil longgggh ago then it was swapped out for sythetic after load a miles with no high or sustained stress on engine
 

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Any reason you guys aren't following Kawasaki recommendations? They made the H2 you think they would know how to break it in. You know with them being engineers and all duh!
 

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I personally don’t understand why this question gets asked. I break in per Kawasaki recommendation what’s the big hurry?
 

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"5) Some say within the first 20 miles (make sure you warm up the engine) to accelerate a few times pretty hard. Loading the rings is not a bad idea."

I have a nice LONG downhill two lane just about a mile from where I live.Within the first 20 miles I always take my new bikes and start at the top,open her up firmly but gently to about 8-9K rpms,then shut the throttle and let her engine brake down through the gears and such.I do this about 4-5 times.Each time increasing the rpms by about 1k.Then just cruise and accelerate briskly during the first 100 or so miles.At around 150 miles I'll change the oil and run her on up to about 10,11K a few times and back down.Using brisk but smooth throttle applications.After a day or so of this,I change oil again and basically,that's it.Up and down the rev range increasing rpms each time.Within about 4 days she's at 600 something miles.Then it's ride her like she's broken in.Never had any engine issues doing it like this.Plenty of power.

I think the worst thing one could probably do at the beginning is drive in too low rpm ranges.That's what I've read and it makes sense.Give er the gas,but just don't ask too much at the first.Gotta feel the motor working it's way to glory!They run these motors up to the limiter on a dyno before ever clearing em for sale.That's what that bar code is.YOUR motor info,in case something happens.
 

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First day I rode my to home 550 miles away. It was about 50 miles on the flat to the first set of hills of around 30 miles then undulating road for the next 200. After that it was another 220 very flat road, then again undulating road to home. Never took it above 4k for the first 200 then up to about 5k for short bursts often. My H2 never freed up until at least 1500 miles and just got more and more lively to 3000 miles and has run sweet since.

Yep, hard break in, do some 1/4 mile drags, change the engine for the next meeting, hard break in again and on it goes or are you guys talking about leaving the engine in the bike for decades?
 

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"My H2 never freed up until at least 1500 miles and just got more and more lively to 3000 miles and has run sweet since."

Yep.Bout the same story here with the motor opening up.I mentioned this on another forum.Got a heckler's welcome.There's more to breaking this in than 'just miles'.I didn't hit redline but one time during the later breakin time.I did however take her up pretty close several times closer to the beginning of break-in.And stayed away from cruising at the same rpms.Even if I changed it to 500 more rpms,I did this continuously for the first 200 or so miles.Ride at say 1500 rpms for a minute or so.Then increase to say 2K for a couple of minutes.Then on up to 3000 and so on.Mine runs like a sewing machine.And of course some upper rpm runs for 10-15 seconds and back down to another set of rpms.Always changing the rpms.
 

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Are you guys aware that Kawasaki specifies the exact same break-in procedure for every bike they make?
Seems strange to me that optimum break-in procedure for a 125cc dirtbike and the industry's 1st and only blown Liter bike is exactly the same.
I'm just saying....
 

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Not strange at all, the technology is more than a century old, pistons still go up and down and crankshafts still rotate. The issues are still the same, slow break in because it's not cost effective at the factory to hand lap in every moving part that has contact with another.

Those guys that recommend a hard break in don't own the machine that has done 100k mikes where that scuff on the bearing comes back to bite $$$$. They are all about now, don't care about later. Yes the engines can take it at the time but later, they don't care, works for them and because they initially have no trouble. I would never buy a demo bike.
Even the gaskets settle through thermal cycling which initially has to be controlled. There are so many factors involved, pity we don't have a KHI design Engineer here to put a lot of the BS to bed.
 

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Explain 'hard break-in'...lol.I'm thinkin since they're ALL the same procedure,it's got more to do with rider safety than anything else.They dyno every bike all the way up to get top HP readings before it leaves the factory.Right off the production line.They don't seem to be concerned with metal chips and stuff scoring their new babies.A wide ranging rpm break-in is a must for these engines.That doesn't (to me)mean hammering it wide open everywhere...no way.But a sensible brisk amount of throttling is probably the best way...IMO.These bikes are dangerous in the inexperienced hands.Lots of those out there.1K miles to get used to a bike like this if one's never had one?Makes sense to me.That goes by pretty quickly.These motors are made to rip.And do it smoothly,in all rpms.
 

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Or possibly even keeping warranty claims down to a minimum. I basically agree with your take on it.
Explain 'hard break-in'...lol.I'm thinkin since they're ALL the same procedure,it's got more to do with rider safety than anything else.They dyno every bike all the way up to get top HP readings before it leaves the factory.Right off the production line.They don't seem to be concerned with metal chips and stuff scoring their new babies.A wide ranging rpm break-in is a must for these engines.That doesn't (to me)mean hammering it wide open everywhere...no way.But a sensible brisk amount of throttling is probably the best way...IMO.These bikes are dangerous in the inexperienced hands.Lots of those out there.1K miles to get used to a bike like this if one's never had one?Makes sense to me.That goes by pretty quickly.These motors are made to rip.And do it smoothly,in all rpms.
 
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