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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have access to it or know where I could find it? Love to give it a read and I can't seem to find it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Come one guys, a gift for Cliff Secord :)
Thanks! But lets consider it a gift for everyone....

I'm comparing the many technical differences between the two bikes in hopes it can be safely modified. For example, in order to make 300hp the H2 needs an air filter with a surface area of 13,000 mm2 to flow enough air.

Why different cams? The H2R cams feature high lift and a wide overlap. The high lift helps large volumes of air enter and exit the combustion chamber quickly...and with the wide overlap, intake air is used to help expel the spent fuel-air mixture out the exhaust ports. What an amazing added use of the supercharger; getting air in and compressing it is standard but modding the cams to use that same forced air to push the exhaust out is brilliant.

Those two items explain why the standard H2's rev range was limited and could save many engines down the line. Not cheap modifications but if you want to make big power safely...

Conversely, converting an R for street use has it's own problems; it has no radiator fans, the second wiring harness and relays for the support electricals (turn signals, lights etc) is not included. The left control stalk looks the same but isn't. Mounting a useful headlight without ruing the look of the bike is a challenge. And then there's the noise....What IS encouraging in some of the H2R literature there are several oddly worded explanations like; KRTC 1 and 2 are for track use and 3 is for 'street' conditions. They kinda maybe sorta make it sound like they expected a few to be converted for road use.

Also of interest; the reason neither bike has a belly pan is for the sake of cooling. The R has no fans and a liquid oil cooler near the bottom and totally depends on that area being open to the air. Both bikes are already fighting hot compressed air from the supercharger so they've got to get rid of heat as quickly as possible. I was going to buy the belly pan (it makes the bike look amazing) but on a hopped up H2 or regular H2R it could be potentially disastrous depending on where and how you're riding it. Still might pick one up to put on at bike shows or days when it's really cool out.

Anyway, when I say I'm going to read it, I mean I'm really going to read it.
 

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Anyway, when I say I'm going to read it, I mean I'm really going to read it.
Cliff, I'd provided an H2 Service Manual to the membership for a while and I would have made an R Service Manual available as well. However, I never found a digital copy. I purchased my R Service Manual from my dealer. $90. USD.:(
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cliff, I'd provided an H2 Service Manual to the membership for a while and I would have made an R Service Manual available as well. However, I never found a digital copy. I purchased my R Service Manual from my dealer. $90. USD.:(
I appreciate your previous work. I use the parts diagrams quite a lot. Thank you for making those accessible.

That's too bad on the R manual. I was afraid that was the case since it isn't included on the owners USB either. Would've made searches easier.

Oh well, looks like I'm probably reading it the old fashioned way...with eye strain and numb carpel tunnel fingers. :)
 

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I appreciate your previous work. I use the parts diagrams quite a lot. Thank you for making those accessible.

That's too bad on the R manual. I was afraid that was the case since it isn't included on the owners USB either. Would've made searches easier.

Oh well, looks like I'm probably reading it the old fashioned way...with eye strain and numb carpel tunnel fingers. :)
I'm still keeping my eye open for the opportunity to snag a digital R manual. I've two H2 manuals and two R manuals. Two for my home shop and the other two are at my buddie's shop. I hear you on the ease of using the digital version. Print out exactly what you need without worrying about destroying the page. It's so nice for old eyes to also display the pages on a 40" monitor!

I'll make the R manual available if I do find it.
 

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Hi Cliff,
Thanks for the observations about the heat dissipation and the effect of a bellypan. One of the bad jobs about amateur aircraft building is the engine cowling and the size of the air intake and the baffles that you put very close to the air cooled engine to keep the airflow ram aired into cooling distance of the engine. it takes a lot of research to come up with the optimum compromise between drag, airflow and cooling efficiency, especially for speed/drag ratios - Ram air ports are like a drag parachute. Smaller the better from a drag perspective and research shows smaller can be better for airflow too . On the H2 it sounds like the engine is cooled by oil, oil by water and water by air flow. On an old fashioned plane engine you manually optimise the mixture for cruise by having temperature sensors in the exhaust. Getting that wrong will definitely shorten the life of the engine. So I'd guess that if a bellypan was aerodynamically designed to ram air correctly, i.e with engine baffles, it would be OK, even better than open for drag and temps. Except of course when stationary! Planes never stay stationary too long or they will overheat. Plus the old fashioned Lycoming and Continental Aircraft engines are very over-engineered and under powered for longevity and reliability. Plus you need Oil pressure, Oil temp, exhaust temp, cylinder head temp, mixture control, altitude, density altitude, barometric pressure, outside air temps, and coolant temp gauges. Air temp affects mixture and HP.

Baffle Installation for Air Cooled Engines

We need to understand all the stuff in docs like this when we are considering modding a bike that runs at these temps.

http://www.lycoming.com/Portals/0/t...-25-1994)/Fuel Mixture Leaning Procedures.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Hi Cliff,
Thanks for the observations about the heat dissipation and the effect of a bellypan. One of the bad jobs about amateur aircraft building is the engine cowling and the size of the air intake and the baffles that you put very close to the air cooled engine to keep the airflow ram aired into cooling distance of the engine. it takes a lot of research to come up with the optimum compromise between drag, airflow and cooling efficiency, especially for speed/drag ratios - Ram air ports are like a drag parachute. Smaller the better from a drag perspective and research shows smaller can be better for airflow too . On the H2 it sounds like the engine is cooled by oil, oil by water and water by air flow. On an old fashioned plane engine you manually optimise the mixture for cruise by having temperature sensors in the exhaust. Getting that wrong will definitely shorten the life of the engine. So I'd guess that if a bellypan was aerodynamically designed to ram air correctly, i.e with engine baffles, it would be OK, even better than open for drag and temps. Except of course when stationary! Planes never stay stationary too long or they will overheat. Plus the old fashioned Lycoming and Continental Aircraft engines are very over-engineered and under powered for longevity and reliability. Plus you need Oil pressure, Oil temp, exhaust temp, cylinder head temp, mixture control, altitude, density altitude, barometric pressure, outside air temps, and coolant temp gauges. Air temp affects mixture and HP.

Baffle Installation for Air Cooled Engines

We need to understand all the stuff in docs like this when we are considering modding a bike that runs at these temps.

http://www.lycoming.com/Portals/0/t...-25-1994)/Fuel Mixture Leaning Procedures.pdf
I see what you're saying and I think that the belly pan would be fine if, like you were saying, it were designed to channel air properly and you kept moving. Under those circumstances it could probably even improve cooling. BUT the second you stopped at a light for a minute or two all that heat gets trapped then rises and soaks into the pan, block, intake runner, supercharger, oil cooler, the transmission etc. Between the catalyst and that glowing red down pipe I'd be worried about all that trapped heat for street use. The H2 is already on the razors edge using forced induction and a non-cooled intake, I'd be super nervous about bottling any more heat into that area.

I agree at the track though, the belly pan could probably be a good thing. I saw couple of the race teams were using them on the R so it must be working.
 

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Hi 880 Turbo, I bought h2r cams for my h2. Can you share the cam installation page with me from your h2r service manual? I couldnt find h2r manual in my country 😞 thank you for your support! My email [email protected]
 

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Anybody have h2r service manual to share some pges with me? I bought h2r cams for my h2. Can you share the cam installation page with me from your h2r service manual? I couldnt find h2r manual in my country 😞 thank you for your support! My email [email protected]
 

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Hi 880 Turbo, I bought h2r cams for my h2. Can you share the cam installation page with me from your h2r service manual? I couldnt find h2r manual in my country 😞 thank you for your support! My email [email protected]
Hello Caglar,

I'll send you a link to my OneDrive to the relevant pages you need but I won't be able to do this for you until Monday. Just remember what I have is the 2015 H2R Service Manual.
 

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Hi 880 Turbo, I bought h2r cams for my h2. Can you share the cam installation page with me from your h2r service manual? I couldnt find h2r manual in my country 😞 thank you for your support! My email [email protected]
 
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