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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yeah, I know there are plenty of threads mentioning flashtune on the forums but most of them are taken so far off-topic that the useful discussion is totally buried.

This thread is for discussions about FTECU Flashtune and/or their Activetune add-on on a H2.

PLEASE don't fill this thread about Woolich, Power Commander or 3rd party flashes Guhl Brock etc.
I'm not posting this thread as a religious war, it's to share what I learn and to learn from others.


I installed Flashtune after another product didn't work bike side on the 2017 H2. I purchased the Flashtune and Activetune kit from Velox Racing who provided amazing customer service and had actually had this working on the same H2 ECU (21175-1234) so I knew it was doable.

Installation was fairly straight forward, the "top secret" instructions that FTECU allow you to access after you purchase are pretty basic so if you get stuck, just holler, myself or someone else who has done it already can help.

Software is easy to use and available for download from FT ECU without purchasing, you just need to register on their site first. That way you can install the software, make sense of it and be ready to go when the hardware arrives. Velox Racing have also uploaded a couple of great tutorials on YouTube which will help get you started, well worth watching to get a good idea of how it works.

With a click in the software you can disable:

Top Speed Limiter
O2 Sensor
Exhaust Valve
EVAP Valve
Air Switching Valve
Injector Decal Cut
You can also inverse your quickshifter to suit GP pattern hardware.

The software comes with both "stock" and "unrestricted" files for the different H2 ECU's.

The differences between them apart from sensor disabling are ignition and throttle-by-wire changes. There are no fuel change differences between the two sets of maps.

I ran the unrestricted maps and hated the "snatchy throttle" and suspect that a lot of people who mention the snatchy throttle on the forum are running these maps or a variation of them in their 3rd party flashes. I went back to the stock base maps and are tweaking those instead.

Anyway, that's the introduction to Flashtune. In the next post I'll put up some stuff for discussion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
In Flashtune you can set the Throttle-By-Wire (ETV) for each gear in both "full power" and "rain modes" (I won't post the rain modes here to save confusion but you can see them in the software if you install it).

The stock maps are the same for 1st and 2nd gear and another map for 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th.
(you can see see which map it is on the titlebar of the images)

The unrestricted map is the same for all 6 gears.

I think the factory ones are fascinatingly complicated and must be making a million allowances for all sorts of things that the unrestricted maps are ignoring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here are another couple of takes on how to setup the fly by wire.

The pic below with mostly red is a stock 2015 H2R, the other is a tuners take on the maps (ignore the titlebar text on these two).
These are all vastly different which shows there is always different ways to skin that cat.

Of course with different cams the H2R is only posted for reference but it's interesting that Kawa still restrict it in the bottom left quarter at wide throttle positions and low revs.

So which map is right? Dunno!

I'm leaning towards running a stock map for ride-ability but will open up the bottom right quarter of the map to allow high rev, wide throttle to 100%
(but I'm also curious why the H2R has a band in there with 10% less opening)
 

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That narrow looking band is 20% of the actual throttle range , without back to back testing i would assume there is a reason ,ETV blades are pretty close to the TPS value there, but at the change to ETV 100% of tps the actual position changes from 74 to 90 and may need better blending to be smooth
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, that makes some sense Oz.

The other interesting thing about the H2R map is that you could launch it at WOT and have the ETV feed till 7000 (then HANG ON TIGHT)... not that I'm planning on testing it but it does look something like launch control built into the throttle by wire map.

I'm also wondering why the tuners map (post 3) which is partly a copy of the stock map, is dialed down in the top right quarter (high rpm, small throttle opening)
 

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I'm leaning towards running a stock map for ride-ability but will open up the bottom right quarter of the map to allow high rev, wide throttle to 100%
(but I'm also curious why the H2R has a band in there with 10% less opening)

This is what I've done. I run a stock map and only tune the last three throttle percentages. The bike is an absolute mess otherwise. It's not glorious on the dyno but it's faster.
 

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This is the thread I have been waiting for.
I have a question. Has anyone just tried each of the options available such as just turning off the O2 sensor and seeing the results. It would be great if those who had would post the results, even seat of the pants results would be interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is what I've done. I run a stock map and only tune the last three throttle percentages. The bike is an absolute mess otherwise. It's not glorious on the dyno but it's faster.
Agree.

The stock maps produce smooth (linear not "slow") and importantly, predictable power delivery and while the default "unrestricted" map will look great on a dyno run it's no use if you have to button off and on the throttle to ride the bike properly.

I'm pretty sure that some of the stock map is there for emission reasons but much of the <30% throttle is a complicated map that will make allowances for cam and flow (intake and exhaust) and opening the throttle more in these areas will make little difference to real power usage but a lot to ridability.

I think I can assume that Kawasaki have restricted the high rev, high throttle openings on the H2 to protect us from ourselves, the H2R is unrestricted in this area and I wouldn't have a problem opening up the map in any of the >6000rpm and >40% throttle areas.

That should keep part throttle ride able and unleash the beast when you twist the wrist past 1/3rd.

This is the thread I have been waiting for.
I have a question. Has anyone just tried each of the options available such as just turning off the O2 sensor and seeing the results. It would be great if those who had would post the results, even seat of the pants results would be interesting.
Hey Ted, the stock O2 sensor when removed will throw an error light on the dash, the Flashtune setting stops that. Power difference would be pretty hard to measure as the bike only uses that narrow-band O2 sensor at very low revs for emission output reasons. No real gains in removing it but if your aftermarket exhaust doesn't have a bung you can remove the sensor error from the bike.

If you install Flashtune and Activetune you need to remove the narrow-band sensor and install the Bosch LSU4.9 wide-band sensor in a bung in the exhaust. It comes with a bung to weld-in but if you are running something like the Vandemon exhaust it has the dual sized bung in there already.
 

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I run the H2R ETV map in my H2 and always turn off the traction control. I feel that's how the bike should have been released for the street version... At least now I'm getting the performance I paid for... If you're scared get a dog. Haha : )
 

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Agree.

The stock maps produce smooth (linear not "slow") and importantly, predictable power delivery and while the default "unrestricted" map will look great on a dyno run it's no use if you have to button off and on the throttle to ride the bike properly.

I'm pretty sure that some of the stock map is there for emission reasons but much of the <30% throttle is a complicated map that will make allowances for cam and flow (intake and exhaust) and opening the throttle more in these areas will make little difference to real power usage but a lot to ridability.

I think I can assume that Kawasaki have restricted the high rev, high throttle openings on the H2 to protect us from ourselves, the H2R is unrestricted in this area and I wouldn't have a problem opening up the map in any of the >6000rpm and >40% throttle areas.

That should keep part throttle ride able and unleash the beast when you twist the wrist past 1/3rd.



Hey Ted, the stock O2 sensor when removed will throw an error light on the dash, the Flashtune setting stops that. Power difference would be pretty hard to measure as the bike only uses that narrow-band O2 sensor at very low revs for emission output reasons. No real gains in removing it but if your aftermarket exhaust doesn't have a bung you can remove the sensor error from the bike.

If you install Flashtune and Activetune you need to remove the narrow-band sensor and install the Bosch LSU4.9 wide-band sensor in a bung in the exhaust. It comes with a bung to weld-in but if you are running something like the Vandemon exhaust it has the dual sized bung in there already.
Thanks,
Good info. I probably will be keeping the O2 sensor.
I downloaded the FTECU stuff just to familiarize myself with things. I am having a bit of trouble understanding the columns/rows.
The RPM row/column is a no brainer, but what looks like throttle position goes beyond 100%. So that begs the question, is it really throttle position or something else. I don't wear my tin foil hat with antenna at night and I can pick this stuff up. So I have to ask questions, since they don't label the columns and rows.
Anyone have an explanation? Or is there some document I am missing?
 

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After looking at the full power vs. the stock Throttle by wire. Of course the throttle would be snatchy. I looks like it would be downright un-rideable. Nice gradual increases using the stock map past 11k would bring nice smooth, rideable results. One could then ramp up if it needed more, or ramp down if it needed less. but just blasting away with 100s is just rude. Also getting the timing right would bring good results. The H2R map pulls the timing back hard at 14k, it has less compression, it is telling a story. The H2 should follow the same pattern, keep the timing advanced, and pull back gracefully. Maybe not as much because the cams aren't as aggressive. Does the H2R recommend a higher octane fuel? Because they are throwing a bunch of advance in the mid range. It does have less compression but there is 5 degrees in there.

Next question, can you pull the data from the ECU?
 

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I ran the unrestricted maps and hated the "snatchy throttle" and suspect that a lot of people who mention the snatchy throttle on the forum are running these maps or a variation of them in their 3rd party flashes. I went back to the stock base maps and are tweaking those instead.
I think some of the early reflash software, the version which my ECU has, didn't disable the O2 sensor. The closed loop is still active and keeps the mixture very lean. Add to that a 100% throttle map and you have "snatchy".

We tried leaning it off with the PC and the ECU senses it via the lambda sensor and leans it off again. Of course it makes no difference in LSR because you never use that bit of the map but for road riding it's definitely worth getting it sorted. I'm torn between sending my ECU off again for the latest software version or perhaps trying the O2 Eliminator I have from a ZX-10R, the lambda sensor is the same part number as the H2 so I'm hoping it will work.
 

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Yes. You can create a 'read' file.

My 2016 was the first one that Flashtune did and I sent them my ECU file.
Next question:
Has anyone pulled some mapping from some of the pro tuners that have had a good result? Not to take their hard work and publish it. But just to get a good baseline and set up a decent template for starters.
 

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Do you mean a person paying a tuner to do a flash for them so they have a great starting point that they might edit with Flashtune or Woolich just for their own use?
 

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Do you mean a person paying a tuner to do a flash for them so they have a great starting point that they might edit with Flashtune or Woolich just for their own use?
No, more like someone who has a good tune done by a pro, on an otherwise stock bike verified on a dyno and has really good ride-ability.
 

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Next question:
Has anyone pulled some mapping from some of the pro tuners that have had a good result? Not to take their hard work and publish it. But just to get a good baseline and set up a decent template for starters.
I haven't tried reading a Guhl flashed bike but the word is that he has a way to lock his configuration. This is why the ECU must be sent back to him if a person wants adjustments or changes made.

So unfortunately, I can't answer your question for certain.
 

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It's a shame, it would be very useful to some to be able to buy a good flash such as his and then adjust themselves with software they purchased, but then again he has to protect himself against copies of his work (and tweaks based on it) being handed out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
No, more like someone who has a good tune done by a pro, on an otherwise stock bike verified on a dyno and has really good ride-ability.
It's a political discussion really, the creator invests time and want's to be paid, the user wants the ability to improve on it as he already spent his dollars. Same as Microsoft vs Open Source.

This thread has the potential of being the open source and collaborative version of tune.

Remember that any "post in ECU" tune will always be a "safe" average of what is possible and can never exactly suit your environment, riding style or goals.

Heck, the Australian model of the H2 uses the EU ECU so the Kawasaki factory have a tune that suits the Swiss Alps and the Aussie Outback without blowing-up. To do that it can only ever be an average of possibilities, leaning rich in the top end and running lean down low to meet
emission controls in dozens of different countries.

Rolling your own makes sense.

I am having a bit of trouble understanding the columns/rows.The RPM row/column is a no brainer, but what looks like throttle position goes beyond 100%. --snip--
That's a common head scratcher. The throttle position sensor is a potentiometer measuring resistance, table values in the ECU are based on that output and not "converted" to a 0-100 percentage.
 

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I haven't tried reading a Guhl flashed bike but the word is that he has a way to lock his configuration. This is why the ECU must be sent back to him if a person wants adjustments or changes made.
It's a political discussion really, the creator invests time and want's to be paid, the user wants the ability to improve on it as he already spent his dollars. Same as Microsoft vs Open Source.

This thread has the potential of being the open source and collaborative version of tune.
I checked back for what's been said on this before and found this: http://www.ninjah2.org/forum/ninja-...15593-ecueashed-ghul-motors-reflashing-2.html

So, looks to me that Guhl anticipated there would be tons of people that would ask around if anyone would give them a free copy so they could benefit greatly from his work while giving him el-zilcho in return. Therefore if he provided the ECU where other software could read and write it, he'd soon be ripped-off right and left. To solve that, the Guhl flashes, including Brock's version, are unreadable by other flashing software.

Result, it can neither be shared (good) nor be edited by the buyer for own personal use.

That second part is a shame I think, and will stop me from buying which I otherwise would have, as I know I will want further editing beyond PC-V touchups. I'd have gladly paid the asking price to have the excellent starting point. However, I'm pretty sure Guhl would have been ripped off no end were he selling it where it could be copied off the ECU and I certainly don't question his right to do it this way. It just removes the desire I'd otherwise have for it.

The flip side is as ayjayef was saying. There's no natural monopoly here. Where others independently with their own work find solutions and choose to share them, an equally-good, free open-source "competitor" may emerge and hopefully will so everyone can have a great starting point AND be able to edit according to their individual situation.
 
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