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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi guys,

starting fiddling with mine already....
I put a scotoiler on all my bikes as it massively improves chain life and makes maintenance so easy. its looking a little tricky on the H2sx though....

so far, I've found the display fits well on the RHS bar on the brake lever clamp. doesn't get in the way or look out of place.
the reservoir fits nicely into the battery compartment RHS as there is a large vertical gap there.
the problem is the delivery nozzle. I've looked at two locations. first was the chain guard bolt.... the bracket fitted but I couldn't get the delivery hose onto it...http://www.ninjah2.org/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=22385&thumb=1

im now looking at the rear hub. there is a bracket that takes the brake hose. I think its possible to use the mounting bolt for that brake hose clip and fit the delivery nozzle so it oils the inside of the sprocket.
http://www.ninjah2.org/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=22393&thumb=1

there are no bobin mounts so the dual feed adaptor just won't work. anyone got any better ideas or better still, actually fitted one completely?

running wires under the tank looks simple enough. the fairing fixings and bolt arrangement looks similar to the ZZR1400

open to any suggestions that make installation discrete.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've never put a Scottoiler on a bike with an o-ring chain.
Ah, so the concept of chain oiling has passed you by then 😂😂😂

they still need regular oiling. the Scotoiler extends the life massively...
 

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What's with the sarcastic answers ? An O-ring chain still requires external lubrication and the sx is a sports touring bike .
Do you not oil the chain on your H2s ! They still require chain lube .

Sorry rossH2 I've never fitted one ever and have always just used an aerosol type but some distance riders swear by them .
 

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"the reservoir fits nicely into the battery compartment RHS as there is a large vertical gap there.
the problem is the delivery nozzle. I've looked at two locations"...okay,so you actually want a LONG feed line going down,right?Run it along the inside of the swingarm.Routing it OVER the swingarm and down on the inside edge.



If you can get the line riding along the swingarm(maybe some black(thin) zipties?),you could somehow attach the nozzle on the inside of the guard face(fashion a small secure clamp in there),and angle it right into the sprocket/chain.Looks doable.You wouldn't even see the feed line.Except where it drops down from the reservoir.Can you drill a hole in the battery compartment,and run the line through that?
 

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@Supercharged

The sarcastic answer is relating to his challenge to BobC's knowledge of oiling a chain. Obviously a LSR guy would know a bit about whats needed with a chain and high speed maintenance.

I do oil my chain (did) on my H2. Are YOU aware O-ring chains require very little to almost no oil as its just a surface treatment to prevent rust for the chain. The lube is preloaded when the chain is built and held in by the O-rings. They are not like chains from your era that needed the lube to keep them constantly lubed up. The Scotoiler is from an era gone by. Great for your 1974 Honda 750, overkill for a H2 chain. How about instead of being lazy and installing this gadget, just do normal minimal chain maintenance for an O-ring chain.

Now, with that said, if you and the OP are making a point that it extends sprocket life, I am on board with that question. The chain/sprocket does have direct metal/metal friction and no lube on it. I would go with that argument. The counterpoint to that is how much dirt/grime/grit are you accumulating on said parts from a little device constantly dripping oil on them and throwing it all over. Good discussion there I would say.

I still think its a silly gadget that is marketed to the gear queer crowd and chain stretch would occur, requiring chain replacement, way before some type of chain/sprocket wear savings occurs.

NOLA
 

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The perfect lube for an o-ring chain is Maxima Chain Wax. It does not fling off. Oiling a chain if for non o-ring chains. I have had great luck with chain wax and non 0-ring chains.
The cool part is any build up on the sprockets, is you can remove it with a razor blade in a few seconds.
 

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@Supercharged

The sarcastic answer is relating to his challenge to BobC's knowledge of oiling a chain. Obviously a LSR guy would know a bit about whats needed with a chain and high speed maintenance.

I do oil my chain (did) on my H2. Are YOU aware O-ring chains require very little to almost no oil as its just a surface treatment to prevent rust for the chain. The lube is preloaded when the chain is built and held in by the O-rings. They are not like chains from your era that needed the lube to keep them constantly lubed up. The Scotoiler is from an era gone by. Great for your 1974 Honda 750, overkill for a H2 chain. How about instead of being lazy and installing this gadget, just do normal minimal chain maintenance for an O-ring chain.

Now, with that said, if you and the OP are making a point that it extends sprocket life, I am on board with that question. The chain/sprocket does have direct metal/metal friction and no lube on it. I would go with that argument. The counterpoint to that is how much dirt/grime/grit are you accumulating on said parts from a little device constantly dripping oil on them and throwing it all over. Good discussion there I would say.

I still think its a silly gadget that is marketed to the gear queer crowd and chain stretch would occur, requiring chain replacement, way before some type of chain/sprocket wear savings occurs.

NOLA
I think I made my point clear with the turm " external lubrication " .

I don't think there is much to debate on if you need to oil an O-ring chain or run it dry metal to metal even in the most extreme conditions. A nice try with " they are not like the chains from your era" but you will have to do so much better than that to get a bite from me ;)
 

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Well for many it is not really a problem to at the same time keep up with chain cleaning and hand applying lube or wax. But it makes sense that some need an add on device to apply chain lubrication. Is there an add on chain cleaning device? Or is cleaning a per 10,000 miles affair or is the plan for fling-off from the oiler to hopefully carry away enough grit?

For me, constant cleaning is more about keeping clean -- that's the limiting point rather than film of lube being gone yet. (I use Militec-1, but that's a personal eccentricity.)
 

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The original H2 had a chain oiler that you pulled a plunger and it just made a mess. An o-ring chain doesn't need the same level of lube. The good thing about chain wax is goes on like any other spray lube. But you let it set for a bit and it stays put. Automatic oilers will apply the lube and it immediately flings off and ends up on your rim and tire.
 

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@Supercharged

Come on...It was funny though


NOLA
Yep it made me smile .

The original H2 had a chain oiler that you pulled a plunger and it just made a mess. An o-ring chain doesn't need the same level of lube. The good thing about chain wax is goes on like any other spray lube. But you let it set for a bit and it stays put. Automatic oilers will apply the lube and it immediately flings off and ends up on your rim and tire.
My 1939 Triumph Tiger 100 had a tapered screw in the rear of the primary chain case designed for automatic chain oiling . There is very little in motorcycling that is truly new including supercharging.
 

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I didn't intend to stir up a hornet's nest with my remark.

I clean my chain off using something like WD40 and thoroughly dry it, then I use a high quality non-fling chain lube and apply a minimal amount to the links which prevents corrosion - more importantly this very thin film does not cause dirt and grit to adhere, which would actually shorten a chains life.

If you intend using a Scottoiler my advice is to regularly clean it all off. Otherwise your chain will just be coated in a grinding paste.
 

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As a long turm motorcycle user and excavator driver (see picture for proof ) I am absolutely convinced of oiling chains and excavator bucket pins is necessary whatever the conditions . I have run O-ring chains dry on a long run and the chain rollers and sprocket teeth grind together so harshly one could never argue about using a dry chain , similarly using a JCB without greasing the bucket pins they will grind together and jolt and bang . Greasing the pins even digging in sandy conditions extends the life of the pins without question .
 

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Perhaps the difference is that for most, it's not an either/or of chain being dry or having an automatic oiler.

Personally as I see it, if cleaning the chain as often as I think it should be, then lack of lubrication is not an issue. If using an automatic oiler as an excuse for not involving oneself with the chain, it's going to get pretty gritty.

Or, maybe saying the same thing, if having the automatic oiler but cleaning the chain frequently, then what's the use of the automatic oiler?

I have NEVER found my chain anything like dry when going to clean it. But it constantly gets dirtier than I want. Correcting that condition also tops up the lubrication. But that's me perhaps. I cannot imagine what an automatic oiler would add to that situation, other than fling.
 

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I'd be kinda worried about 'fling' gettin on the sidewall.I've had that happen when using particular oils.Plus the mess.I want to ride,not spend hours wiping my bike off.Simple kerosine/soft brush cleaning.Blow dry.Maxima Wax.Always been really good.Takes me about 30 minutes,around every 500 miles or so.Sometimes sooner.But it's not a pain.And the bike stays clean.The key with the Maxima is...it needs to sit for around 1/2 hour to actually stay fling free.I rode mine one time just after applying.I happened to look down at the wheel for something.The whole side wall and frame were splattered with it.Never again.Pulled off the road and wiped it down as best I could.It really was a dangerous situation waiting to happen on any lefthander.
Sometimes I get lucky like that.
 

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I tried Chain Wax once upon a time. The two chains that I used the Chain Wax on, had the shortest life by far of any chain I've ever had on a street bike. (About 10,000 km)

Kawasaki service manuals typically recommend using gear oil.

What I've found works best ... Oil! While spinning the wheel on a paddock stand apply a stripe on top of each row of O rings and then apply another stripe on all the rollers, then wipe off the excess with an old rag so that it doesn't fling everywhere.

Since starting to use oil, I haven't worn out a single chain. The one on my ZX10R has about 30,000 km on it.
 
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