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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
better luck for the next time dovi ...
record motogp
Andrea Dovizioso 356.9 km/h
record of a nobody with an h2 357 km/h (375 in the speed meter) ��
my motorcycle has nothing very sophisticated
ecgin flash woolich
PCV autotune
rg62 stacks
dna air filter
brocks full exhaust
1 tooth + front sprocket and 4 less i the rear sprocket
the 6th is eating it all! until the rpm cut is reached

 

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With such high gearing, does the bike ever wheelie in first/second gear?
 

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better luck for the next time dovi ...
record motogp
Andrea Dovizioso 356.9 km/h
record of a nobody with an h2 357 km/h (375 in the speed meter) ��
my motorcycle has nothing very sophisticated
ecgin flash woolich
PCV autotune
rg62 stacks
dna air filter
brocks full exhaust
1 tooth + front sprocket and 4 less i the rear sprocket
the 6th is eating it all! until the rpm cut is reached

So u have the rg62 gears and stacks
U have autortune so u obviously didn’t dyno it.
1+ front -4 back... that’s like 6-7 down in back that’s talllll
How much hp u think ur pushing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Also how did u manage to get speedometer to read past limit.
I thought woolich flashed to that point eliminates high beams nnturn signals

if high lights, horn and turn signals do not work
At the moment I'm going to use the speedometer with all the original functions, it's fun to see that more than 370 km / h in the but that's really not the real speed. that's why I use a gps
h2r when it reaches 400 km / h they are not real, they should be about 380 / no more
 

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Also how did u manage to get speedometer to read past limit.
I thought woolich flashed to that point eliminates high beams nnturn signals

if high lights, horn and turn signals do not work
At the moment I'm going to use the speedometer with all the original functions, it's fun to see that more than 370 km / h in the but that's really not the real speed. that's why I use a gps
h2r when it reaches 400 km / h they are not real, they should be about 380 / no more
Could get a speedohealer n have a professional Calibrate it
 

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Could get a speedohealer n have a professional Calibrate it
I'm not sure they have developed one yet. But it is as accurate as you allow it to be. Myself - and many others - have compared it against gps and they both record the same max mph (if that's what you were alluding too)? Where the discrepancy exist stems from how it is recorded. For one example, if you crack the throttle open and let off immediately at say xxxmph the speedohealer tsm will recall that same xxx, but the gps will indicate a different number usually a bit lower the amount depending on how quickly you let off the throttle. Do a second run but this time do not immediately let off the throttle instead hold it there for 2 or more seconds and the two measurements of speed are now closer if not identical. If you enjoy bragging rights at a price that can't be beat it's a great tool. Else if you have more money than sense and prefer to have a oversized receipt embroidered with your name date and the org that processed your purchase, skip the speedohealer and enter a land speed event directly. In that way, your measurement of speed becomes exclusive.
 

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Could get a speedohealer n have a professional Calibrate it
I'm not sure they have developed one yet. But it is as accurate as you allow it to be. Myself - and many others - have compared it against gps and they both record the same max mph (if that's what you were alluding too)? Where the discrepancy exist stems from how it is recorded. For one example, if you crack the throttle open and let off immediately at say xxxmph the speedohealer tsm will recall that same xxx, but the gps will indicate a different number usually a bit lower the amount depending on how quickly you let off the throttle. Do a second run but this time do not immediately let off the throttle instead hold it there for 2 or more seconds and the two measurements of speed are now closer if not identical. If you enjoy bragging rights at a price that can't be beat it's a great tool. Else if you have more money than sense and prefer to have a oversized receipt embroidered with your name date and the org that processed your purchase, skip the speedohealer and enter a land speed event directly. In that way, your measurement of speed becomes exclusive.
I understand what your saying
Speedohealer just makes the speedometer readable without having to have a gps on you at all times and charged or a wire sticking out the bike
 

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I'm not sure they have developed one yet. But it is as accurate as you allow it to be. Myself - and many others - have compared it against gps and they both record the same max mph (if that's what you were alluding too)? Where the discrepancy exist stems from how it is recorded. For one example, if you crack the throttle open and let off immediately at say xxxmph the speedohealer tsm will recall that same xxx, but the gps will indicate a different number usually a bit lower the amount depending on how quickly you let off the throttle. Do a second run but this time do not immediately let off the throttle instead hold it there for 2 or more seconds and the two measurements of speed are now closer if not identical. If you enjoy bragging rights at a price that can't be beat it's a great tool. Else if you have more money than sense and prefer to have a oversized receipt embroidered with your name date and the org that processed your purchase, skip the speedohealer and enter a land speed event directly. In that way, your measurement of speed becomes exclusive.
There are a few more factors why a speedo and the GPS read differently.

The first is sample rates, a GPS has to take samples to calculate speed. Travel x distance in y time. So depending on when a sample is taken and the next sample, you may still be accelerating and although you are actually going say 200 when the second sample was taken, when the first sample was taken you were doing 190. So the result might be 195. Hold that 200 for a complete set of samples and you get 200.

At speed one would be surprised at how much tire slip you get. The aeros are pushing down on the front and the rear is just skimming along and the tire just slips. And on modern bikes the speed is taken off of the rear tire. A speedo healer helps at say speeds up to 130ish, then all bets are off as to how much the rear tire starts to slip especially when you are putting out the kind of power an H2 does.
 

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Somewhere I read the H2 calculates the slip with reference to the front wheel. It knows the actual speed but I don't know if it outputs it to the speedo, the IMU certainly knows.
 

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Appreciate the alternating pov's. There is a video, one in particular, that sort of spurred my interest to try this out in comparing gps vs the tsm of the speedohealer. I don't want to post it here because of the sensitivity of the topic out of respect for those that take this aspect of sportbike riding more seriously. But for those that might be interested there's a video titled no bull 200. In it, a gps (garmin I believe) is strapped next to the analog speedometer where the rider holds it over 200mph and both the gps and the speedometer are what appears to be identical. I'm not certain there is a way to verify the accuracy of that video. Has anyone who has seen something like that before been able to dispute it? Perhaps it was just a coincidence?
 

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The speed reading is 100% from the rear wheel. There is a correlation with the front for traction control, but the speedometer doesn't display an accurate speed. It's off by 5-7% depending on tire size etc. Don Guhl offers a new abs/speed ring that is accurate to within 1% at top speed.

There is no speedohealer for this bike, and I doubt there ever will be considering where the bike gets it's pickup from.
 
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Somewhere I read the H2 calculates the slip with reference to the front wheel. It knows the actual speed but I don't know if it outputs it to the speedo, the IMU certainly knows.
That is true to some extent. It is a factor for traction control and ABS, but only a factor, TC is mostly about sudden changes in speed. The front wheel while accelerating can be mostly off the ground so there is no real way they can use it for any real calculation other than ABS again sudden changes in speed, or a slide where they can detect the lean angle and a sudden change in speed.

But for a speedo, traditionally they make them read a bit high. That does quite a bit for the customer, one it actually cuts down on tickets, two the rider thinks they are going faster, third it actually cuts down on speed related accidents. Not to mention bragging rights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Also I’m assuming you did the sc gears too ?

I do not have sc gears just ecu flash, velocity stacks and pcv / autotune, dna air filter and brocks exhaust nothing more
This year I plan to go for everything!
sc gears stage 3
h2r cams
intercooler and something else ..
this h2 when finished will be unique, bad and will violate the repetitive h2r!
 

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From the 2017 specs.

Riders can choose from nine modes, each offering a progressively greater level of intrusion (previous years offered 3 rider modes). Riders may also elect to turn the system off.
Modes 1-6 are tailored for circuit riding, while Mode 7-9 settings were optimized for street-like conditions. The KTRC system combines the logic and control of Kawasaki’s earlier traction control systems (S-KTRC, KTRC) in each mode. Primary operation is similar to S-KTRC, which prioritizes maximum forward acceleration. But should excessive rear wheel speed be detected while operating in any mode, engine output is reduced to a level where grip can be regained, facilitating smooth riding.
Highly sophisticated programming allows a degree of slip—a certain amount of slip is required to maximize acceleration. The ideal slip ratio varies according to conditions, so the system looks at a number of parameters to get an accurate real-time picture of what is going on: front and rear wheel speed (slippage) and various engine, machine and rider input parameters are monitored.
Because the sophisticated software bases its dynamic analysis on the chassis’ orientation relative to the track surface (rather than relative to a horizontal plane), it is able to take into account corner camber, gradient, etc., and adapt accordingly. It also automatically adjusts for tire wear, different tire profiles, high-grip tires, and numerous other factors that setting-type systems treat as fixed parameters.
Using complex analysis, the system is able to adjust for unfavorable traction conditions. By acting before slippage exceeds the range for optimum traction, drops in power can be minimized, resulting in ultra-smooth operation.
 
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