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Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering riding from Southern Florida to Tucson, Az via route 10. I've only ridden the bike in 100 mile stretches in the Florida interior and that hasn't been too bad thanks to the cruise control and music. Not sure what 400-500 miles a day would be like though and would appreciate feedback from someone that's done it.
Obvious concerns would be rain and strong winds. Would be doing this in early summer and returning in early fall. In theory this is part touring bike but it is light for long distances and comfort.
 

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Best deal is to just get out and ride say a 200+ mile day.See how that feels.Then on up some more.I can easily knock off 4-500 miles in one day on my H2.Long ride like you plan,check weather for trip days.Rain's not too bad if ya run around 60-65 or so.How's your bike actually feel after a ride?Sore butt?Muscle stretch?You should definitely be fine on that beastie.Freeway riding should be a lot easier than hittin twisty roads.You probably won't get much of that on your trip.Take lots of healthy snacks with ya and just pull and munch when ya want.Also some sort of drinks.I always go with coffee drinks in my backpack and beef/cheese sticks.Take some tylenol or something for aches.Ear plugs for yer brain.

If you're only doing 100 miles or so now...you need to see how a longer run will be.
 

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Yes agree. I generally don't get sore riding, as I've been a gym rat my whole life and weigh 170 lbs, however I am 65 (lol), but as you suggest a 400 mile stretch (a loop) on straight highway (not the most interesting but would simulate the trip better) is what I need to do before commiting to a longer trip. Thought about shipping it and flying. One of my big concerns is the long desert stretches in west texas, before hitting el paso. Would likely need to control my impulses to speed, put it on cruise control and carry a couple of liters of extra gas just in case. My real desire is to have it in Tuscan and then go up to my old stomping grounds in Utah and Colorado. Some very beautiful canyons and scenery there.
 

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My longest is 2100 miles about 41 hours. Also did 1100 miles in 22 hours, I love the bike. April was a year for me and I'm over 23,000 miles.

Sent from my SM-T827V using Tapatalk
 

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Your window is coming up, if you wait until October you are taking a chance of cold/wet/frozen riding in Colorado, plus daylight hours are shrinking. When you consider your lodging options, you're booking in advance usually, meaning you have to remain on the schedule, and if you bite off more than you can chew, the whole schedule gets fouled. 350 miles per day plus or minus 50 is about the limit I plan for, although my 2,000 mile 2 state trip was almost exclusively mountains and canyon, glorious! I started each day early and wanted to arrive by late afternoon to get cooled down, settle in, relax over dinner, beverage, and turn in early. I packed as light as I could out of necessity, do not have the bags so packing would take me a while longer, bungie'd behind me but carried all I needed. Very little rain to contend with but temps varied from 104-37F. My MSR ISDE Gore-Tex jacket and Pants served well, airy and dry, warm or cool when it had to be. The cruise control was a big help in allowing me to move around, sit upright, stand etc. The heated grips too, when your hands are warm, the warmth flows through your torso. With a fleece collar, I was surprised how comfortable I could remain even when it was below 40 degrees. The Bridgestone S22 tires felt soft and planted at all times, excellent grip and life. I think if you have to make 450-500 miles daily, you are forcing the limits of endurance, darkness and chance, and it will cease to be fun.

I had considered making this trip on my KLR650 as an adventure bike, which would have been great fun also. That bike lacks the cruise control and heated grips but has an all day comfort upright riding position, plenty of room on the wide seat to move about, the fairing offers less wind protection to your torso but your hands are still out of the wind because of the hand guards. I would have gained range between fill-ups and the option to explore off-road but what I would have given up, was that rush of supercharged passing power to get around those long lines of stacked cars, trucks and motorhomes, which really shortened the trip, nice! I don't think you should count on making up a lot of time speeding on the interstate though, you'll just get nailed for it.

My $0.02
 

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Did you use their panniers and/or did you something else? I'm thinking of putting another bag between the two panniers and travelling from Florida to Colorado. Figure it will take 3-4 days. Looking forward to riding in the mountains.
 

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Which Topcase did you pick and did you remove the passenger seat for it?
 

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Good Post

I would be leaving in late August or early September from Utah/Colorado back to Florida. I am very familiar with the weather there and it's predictable that it's unpredictable. Good advice on the lodging, that is along the lines I was thinking. Also 350 miles a day makes sense and allows for rides with maybe 2 rest breaks (lunch) at a leisurely pace. What gloves did you use? I'm not crazy about the ones I have currently and don't think they would be good for long distances. Also curious on your mpg if you kept track of it. I will likely fill up every 175 miles and am hoping for 40-45 mpg. Not sure how accurate the bike's computer read out is on that. In 6th at 65-70 it seems to indicate 45-50 mpg. I will likely be doing a lot of desert riding, just due to the fact that my first stop will be Tucson to visit my daughter. From there to Utah/Colorado is serious desert. Were you monitoring the weather each day before you ride?


Your window is coming up, if you wait until October you are taking a chance of cold/wet/frozen riding in Colorado, plus daylight hours are shrinking. When you consider your lodging options, you're booking in advance usually, meaning you have to remain on the schedule, and if you bite off more than you can chew, the whole schedule gets fouled. 350 miles per day plus or minus 50 is about the limit I plan for, although my 2,000 mile 2 state trip was almost exclusively mountains and canyon, glorious! I started each day early and wanted to arrive by late afternoon to get cooled down, settle in, relax over dinner, beverage, and turn in early. I packed as light as I could out of necessity, do not have the bags so packing would take me a while longer, bungie'd behind me but carried all I needed. Very little rain to contend with but temps varied from 104-37F. My MSR ISDE Gore-Tex jacket and Pants served well, airy and dry, warm or cool when it had to be. The cruise control was a big help in allowing me to move around, sit upright, stand etc. The heated grips too, when your hands are warm, the warmth flows through your torso. With a fleece collar, I was surprised how comfortable I could remain even when it was below 40 degrees. The Bridgestone S22 tires felt soft and planted at all times, excellent grip and life. I think if you have to make 450-500 miles daily, you are forcing the limits of endurance, darkness and chance, and it will cease to be fun.

I had considered making this trip on my KLR650 as an adventure bike, which would have been great fun also. That bike lacks the cruise control and heated grips but has an all day comfort upright riding position, plenty of room on the wide seat to move about, the fairing offers less wind protection to your torso but your hands are still out of the wind because of the hand guards. I would have gained range between fill-ups and the option to explore off-road but what I would have given up, was that rush of supercharged passing power to get around those long lines of stacked cars, trucks and motorhomes, which really shortened the trip, nice! I don't think you should count on making up a lot of time speeding on the interstate though, you'll just get nailed for it.

My $0.02
 

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I would be leaving in late August or early September from Utah/Colorado back to Florida. I am very familiar with the weather there and it's predictable that it's unpredictable. Good advice on the lodging, that is along the lines I was thinking. Also 350 miles a day makes sense and allows for rides with maybe 2 rest breaks (lunch) at a leisurely pace. What gloves did you use? I'm not crazy about the ones I have currently and don't think they would be good for long distances. Also curious on your mpg if you kept track of it. I will likely fill up every 175 miles and am hoping for 40-45 mpg. Not sure how accurate the bike's computer read out is on that. In 6th at 65-70 it seems to indicate 45-50 mpg. I will likely be doing a lot of desert riding, just due to the fact that my first stop will be Tucson to visit my daughter. From there to Utah/Colorado is serious desert. Were you monitoring the weather each day before you ride?
That would be the ideal perfect time frame for motorcycle ride, cooling off but still warm, kids in school etc.

I prefer thinner leather gloves that give me feel and feedback, with extra leather protection in the palms and hard shell over the knuckles over gloves that are thick, insulating and warm. I have a problem finding gloves I really like, it's a personal thing and I obsess probably too much. As such they are not all weather wet gloves, so I carried two pair. The wet weather pair were basic Acerbis motocross gloves, and I just accept riding with wet hands until it's over, then switch back to my primary gloves which are Klim Induction Perforated Leather. That strategy only works because as you know we have short duration very wet storms, not usually the continuous long duration uninterrupted rain like you could experience in Florida. It dries out quickly in Colorado and Utah, so the MSR Racing GoreTex ISDE jacket and pants (no longer made) I cherish because the cordura shell is kevlar reinforced, thin shell with liner and ventilation zippers. The shell will get soaked but the liner keeps dry, and the whole thing dries quickly in the arid climates and high desert, mountain tundra. A fleece neck warmer is indispensable. It's the seal around my neck that goes on and off according to my body temperature, and everything else can pretty much stay on for the whole ride. I have studied the adventure riding suits but *so far* don't like their bulk. Riding gear is a never ending journey, the goal is to find new replacements for the old stuff you liked before it's worn out.

I tracked every tank the old fashioned way, divided the fuel I purchased into the miles I rode, I never looked at the mileage computer. Most tanks were around 45 mpg, the worst I remember was 40, could have been a 38 in there possibly, and best was several instances of 48. If I wasn't riding for sport, I tried to keep the RPM low, used cruise control lots, and I usually went about 125-130 miles between fills, usually took less than 3 gallons, was careful because I understood for hard riding the SX SE could be thirsty, didn't want to run out of fuel, but never came close. I have had tanks of 180 miles or so in familiar local surroundings. But...on the road from Florida, I suspect you will get worse mileage due to denser air. When you get out to Colorado/Utah it will improve as engine is making less power.

And yes, I was monitoring the weather each day with Pinpoint Weather App and Accuweather. This only mattered as an advisory starting out each morning. What I didn't want to be doing was stopping to put stuff on or take it off, didn't have the bags that you will. So even though I had a separate rainsuit, I only used it once and could have done without it altogether with the MSR GoreTex. There were a couple of really hot days in Utah where I rode without the jacket.

I envy your trip. I know exactly the roads you will be riding in both Colorado and Utah, they are my favorites.

https://www.jpcycles.com/product/400-1653/klim-men-s-induction-black-perforated-leather-gloves


Red Mountain Pass, Ouray Colorado
 
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